Posts filed under ‘Maharashtrian’

Fasting and feasting- Bhagar (spicy Barnyard millet) and Danyachi (Groundnut) Amti

Bhagar and Danyachi amti is a typical Maharashtrian feast made during religious fasts.This spicy dish is a great gluten free meal option even on non-fasting days

Continue Reading July 15, 2016 at 1:50 am 1 comment

‘Super Grains’ for a Super Summer Breakfast!Nagli Ambil/Ragi Kanji Recipe

Nagli Ambil (Ragi Kanji) is a quick,rustic porridge made from Nagli/Ragi/Finger Millet flour, usually served for breakfast in many parts of Maharashtra. The nutritive benefits of Nagli are well known since ancient times. In fact these are our very own ‘Super Grains’,making a fashionable comeback of sorts, with smart colourful boxes labelled ‘Millets’ , sitting fashionably on the health food aisle in supermarkets! 🙂 A bowl of Ragi Kanji in the morning serves as a calcium+protein rich, power packed breakfast and also helps to keep the body cool (nugget of my Grandma’s wisdom J). This is one of my most…

Continue Reading April 27, 2016 at 3:49 am 2 comments

India’s Best blogger, Khadya Jatra and Khandeshi Cuisine

India’s Best blogger, Khadya Jatra and Khandeshi Cuisine….confused? …read on 🙂

2016 seems to have started on a very positive note! Betterbutter had organized ‘ India’s top blogger contest ‘.To participate we had to Curate a meal for two in a foodbook to make a complete meal. I participated and my foodbook menu included- Meetha Pan spritzer, Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas, Garam Masala spiced Palak Paneer Timbale and Meringue nests topped with Mango curd and fruits. foodbook

As you must have guessed by now, I won the India’s top blogger contest! The prize is as awesome as the concept & contest- a gorgeous orange coloured Le Creuset Casserole! Thank you again Betterbutter for this!

le crueset

The recipes are already on the blog or you can check out the foodbook and some of my recipes here on betterbutter.

Khadya Jatra: I wrote this article for a Facebook group initiated by Saee of My Jhola– Angat Pangat, which re-discovers traditional Maharashtrian cuisine. We are starting with a new series on the group called ‘Khadya Jatra’ #APKhafyaJatra ,where a specialist of a particular sub-cuisine of Maharashtra will curate some background information about it and give an authentic recipe with step by step images.Members can then try out the recipe and thus get a chance to learn about the sub-cuisine and recipes.

I am fortunate to be the first ‘specialist’ and Saee invited me to curate some information and a recipe about Khandeshi Cuisine.Thank you Saee for this,I am honoured.

Spicy, fiery gravies with a thick sinful layer of oil floating on top (tarri) -that’s a trademark Khandeshi dish for you!

Nashik (where I stay) borders the Khandesh region (some parts of present Nashik district are part of Khandesh),has a strong influence of the Khandesi cuisine and you can see specialties like Misal and Shev Bhaji dished out at every nook and corner.

The quintessential Kala Masala forms the base of most gravies (rassa) along with dry coconut (khobra), onion and garlic. These are traditionally served with Bhakri or Rice.

pasta and dubuk vade 1.jpg

Peanuts and peanut oil is also extensively used for cooking. Peanuts, small green lavangi mirchi or fiery Red mirchi, garlic are roasted on an iron griddle or directly on charcoal, pounded in a wooden mortar and pestle (Badgi-musal) to make the famed Thecha. Apart from the staple Jowar Bhakri, Kalnyachi Bhakri- Chutney is very popular with most Khandeshi’s. Kalna is a blend of Jowar + Urad and is served with a spicy peanut chutney.

2012-10-02

The Khandeshi love for eggplants need not be stressed. Be it Bharit made using large green eggplants (Jalgaoni Vangi) or small eggplants stuffed with kala masala or mashed eggplants (Ghotleli Bhaji), every Khandeshi loves this vegetable! The Ghotleli Bhaji and Dal batti are part of many festivities in most Khandeshi households.

Mande (Khandeshi version of Puran Poli) and Wheat Kheer are the popular sweets from the region.

The hot summers are utilized to make different types of Papads and Vade (Valvan) like the laborious yet rewarding Bibde.

A very popular Khandeshi preparation is Patodyachi (or Patvadya) Bhaji. Rolled out Besan flour dough is cut into strips and cooked in a spicy kala masala gravy. The other lesser known form of this preparation is called ‘Dubuk Vade’. Instead of making strips, dumplings are made from the besan batter and cooked in a similar gravy. I am guessing the name Dubuk comes from the noise it makes when a dumpling is dropped in the gravy-I am not sure of this though 🙂

Dubuk Vade 1

 It is simple, it is spicy, it is fiery, it uses Kalal masala gravy and it is absolutely lip smacking- ticking all the right boxes for typical Khandeshi, homestyle food. I have toned down the heat and oil to suit our taste; you can adjust it to yours.

Dubuk Vade 2.jpg

Here’s the recipe for Dubuk Vade

Recipe serves ~ 3-4 persons

Ingredients

For the Rassa

2 onions, sliced

¼ cup dry coconut, grated (Khobra)

4-5 garlic cloves

Handful of fresh coriander leaves, cleaned and washed

2 teaspoons Kala Masala (or to taste)

1 teaspoon Red chilli powder

½ teaspoon turmeric powder

2+2 tablespoon oil, divided (or more if you like)

2 teaspoon Cumene seeds (jeera)

Salt to taste

Water as required

For the vade (dumplings)

¾ cup Besan, sieved (gram flour)

2-3 garlic cloves, finely minced or grated

½- 1 teaspoon red chilli powder

½ teaspoon turmeric powder

¼ teaspoon asafoetida (hing)

Salt to taste

Method

To make the Rassa

Heat 2 tablespoon oil on an iron griddle or in an iron wok.

Add the onions and garlic and sauté till the onions start browning. Stir so that the onions and garlic are sautéed evenly.

Add the grated coconut and sauté till it just starts browning and starts emitting the aroma.

Add the coriander. Stir around to mix.

Take it off the heat and add the red chilli powder and kala masala.

Mix and cool completely.

Grind the masala, in a blender, using very little water to a smooth paste.

Heat the remaining oil in a saucepan/wok.

Add the cumin seeds.

Once they sizzle, add the ground masala and sauté.

Cook till the water evaporates and the oil starts oozing out, taking care not to burn the masala.

Add sufficient water (about 2 ½ -3 cups) to make a medium consistency gravy.

Season with salt and let the Rassa boil for a few minutes.

Meanwhile make the dumplings

Mix all the ingredients under dumplings. Add water to make a batter of dropping consistency (~ ½ cup)

Drop spoonfuls of the batter in the boiling Rassa, working quickly so that all the dumplings cook evenly. Add little water to the bowl/vessel in which you made the dumpling batter, whisk and add that to the gravy so that it will thicken a bit.

Cook for a few minutes till the dumplings are cooked through (about 8-10 minutes) and the gravy thickens a bit. (add water if it is too thick)

Serve hot with Jowar Bhakri or Rice, with a raw onion and lemon wedge on the side

Note: If you want that layer of oil floating on top, use more oil and chilli powder.

 

March 14, 2016 at 5:44 pm 8 comments

karale (कारळे) /Khurasni(खुरसणी)/ Niger seeds chutney and stuffed Bhindi/Okra

Every time I put a photo of the coming soon recipe on My Foodcourt’s FB page the ‘soon’ never happens. The past month has just zoomed past me (the entire half year for that matter!). Both the kids are back to school after a two month long vacation. The little one started going to her ‘new school’, she is very happy that she finally gets to go to her dada’s school 🙂

The  hot sultry summer has given way to a breezy-rainy weather. The Monsoon has also brought with it the much awaited new season’s of Masterchef Australia and White collar – lots of things to look up to; just like this chutney.

I have been meaning to make this chutney for many days but the easy availability of a readymade/mom-made chutney kept me from making it  till now.

The chutney that I am talking about is made from karale (कारळे) / Khurasni (खुरसणी) in Marathi or as I learned from Shruti on the FB page, they are known as Niger seeds in English. More on Niger seeds here.

The seeds are pound with garlic and red chilly powder to make a very tempting fiery chutney usually eaten with bhakri, Roti or hot rice. This chutney is also used as a filling for veggies like brinjal. I did not have brinjals and hence I added the chutney to the filling I made to stuff Bhindi/okra. The result was a fantyastic tasting spicy side dish. The lad kept asking for more and failed to notice the number of Rotis that went into his tummy. 🙂

Here’s the recipe for the Niger Seeds chutney:

1 cup from karale (कारळे) /Khurasni(खुरसणी) or Niger seeds

~ 10-12 garlic pods peeled (you may use less)

2 tsp red chilli powder (you can add more)

Salt to taste

Method:

Lightly roast the Niger seeds for 1-2 minutes (take care not to burn them)

Grind/ pound together all the ingredients to a dry chutney. I started by using a wooden morter and pestle but pounding the seeds to a fine powder was taking time so gave in and used the mixer.

Serve this with hot BhakriRoti/Rice preferably with a drizzle of groundnut oil.

Recipe for stuffed Okra with Niger seed chutney:

10-12 medium sized fresh and tender Bhindi/okra, washed, dried and slit lengthwise

2 tbsp oil

Juice of half a lemon/lime

Fresh coriander leaves for garnish

For the stuffing:

2 medium sized onions peeled and grated

½ cup roasted groundnut powder

4 tsp above Niger seeds chutney

2 tsp Kanda Lasoon masala (optional.I used my mom’s.)

Salt to taste.

Method:

Mix all the ingredients for stuffing.

Stuff the okra with it.

Heat oil in a wide flat bottom nonstick pan. Add the stuffed bhindi carefully.

Cook for 3-4 minutes without stirring.

Stir carefully.

Cover and cook for the next 3-4 minutes. Add a few drops of lime juice and stir once.

Cook uncovered till done (not very soft or mushy ). If you have the time and the patience cook uncovered all the time stirring only occasionally.

Garnish with fresh coriander leaves.

Serve hot with Bhakri,Roti or Rice.

Aparna of My Diverse Kitchen has started a  series of photography exercises for amateur food photographers. See last month’s exercise for My Foodcourt here.

The theme for this month’s exercise was ‘Less is More’, which is currently my style of photography. The chutney as well as stuffed Okra/Bhindi  photos above was taken with this theme in mind.Keep it simple is currently my photography mantra too.

Thank you again Aparna for coming out with these simple but helpful themes for the exercise.

June 25, 2012 at 10:21 am 4 comments

Ambe Dal

The Mango Mania refuses to leave us. First the tangy green raw mangoes and now the luscious ripe ones. I am still hooked on to the raw mangoes and have been using them in every way I can.

Ambe Dal is a traditional Maharashtrian preparation, specially made during these hot summer days when green Mangoes are abundant. It’s super quick and easy to make (with the exception that you need to soak the dal in advance) and requires just a few easily available ingredients.

The tart raw mangoes are grated and added to coarsely ground soaked chana dal (split Bengal gram). This mixture is then flavoured with a spicy tadka (tempering) of Red chillies, curry leaves and asafoetida . I personally love the flavor of asafoetida .

This cool,tangy-spicy Ambe Dal is served on a banana leaf along with Aam Panha (recipe here)

Here’s the recipe for Ambe Dal

Ingredients

1 cup Chana dal (split Bengal gram) soaked in water for 5-6 hours

½ raw mango, peeled and grated (depending on the tartness the amount can be adjusted)

½ tsp sugar

Salt to taste

For the tadka (tempering)

3tsp oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

½ tsp cumene seeds

5-6 curry leaves

Pinch of asafoetida

1-2 dry Red chillies broken into pieces

Method

Rinse and Drain the soaked Chana dal.

Grind the dal coarsely .

Add the grated mango, salt and sugar .

In a small wok/pan heat the oil.

Add the mustard seeds and once they splutter add the cumene seeds.

Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and the red chillies.

Add this tadka over the Mango Dal mixture and mix nicely .

Cool and serve on a banana leaf along with Aam Panha. I love to ‘cool this dal in the refrigerator for half an hour and then serve.

May 9, 2012 at 12:57 pm 7 comments

Mirchi cha Chatka aka Yoghurt Mirchi

Mirchi is Chilly (here dark green ‘Lavangi’ Mirch) and Chatka means ‘burn’ in Marathi. Does that give you an indication of how fiery this recipe must be? This recipe is sure to burn your taste buds.

This is an out –and- out chilli entusiats’ recipe.

I have used dark green Mirchi (something like ‘Lavangi’)for this recipe which is more Pungent. If your palette cannot tolerate the heat, use chillies which are less pungent.

Before you enjoy this ‘Chatka’ make sure your room is well ventilated or even better switch on the AC or the fan J

I have to warn you like the ‘Radio Mirchi’ RJ- It’s Hot J

Mirchi-cha Chatka for this month’s JFI-Mirchi hosted by the Nandita of Saffrontrail. or Yoghurt Mirchi for this week’s letter ‘Y’ for A to Z of Indian Cuisine hosted by Nupur of One Hot Stove (Hey Nupur I am not Cheating J )

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Mirchi cha Techa aka Yoghurt Mirchi recipe

_____________________________________________________ 

5-6 Green Chillies (Dark green variety)

1 tsp roasted cumene seeds

2 tbsp Curd/Yoghurt whiskedPinch of sugar (optional)

Salt to taste 

Roast the Green chillies directly on Flame. You can use a fork or Skewer to hold the chillies. If you don’t have a direct flame burner you can also grill the chillies.

mirchichatka1.jpg

Roast till almost black spots appear on the chillies.

mirchichatka2.jpg

Cool and pound together with the roasted cumene seeds. Don’t grind the chillies to a fine paste if you are using a mixer. Grind them coarsely.

In a small bowl add the coarsely ground Chillies and curds.

Mix nicely and then add a pinch of sugar and salt to taste.

Mix and serve with Bhakri, Paratha or Sabudana(Sago) Khichdi

 mirchichatka3.jpg

         Don’t go by the placid colour of this recipe…It’s Hot J 

Other hot Chilli recipes on My Foodcourt here and here

July 26, 2007 at 10:42 am 13 comments

Kurdai-Gavhacha Cheek-Gavhachya Saalacha Upma for RCI June: Maharashtrian Cuisine!

 Translating that title in English is rather difficult so read on…

No Maharshtrian feast is complete without accompaniments such as Papad and Kurdai.

In fact summer is the time the business of making Papads, Kurdais etc..flourishes in many households here.

Kurdai is a delicious snack akin to papads, but made from Wheat. These are usually made during the summer time,sun dried and stored in every household, just like papads and fried whenever required.You need lots of patience and time to make these pearly white, noodle like Kurdais.

  

             Sun-dried Kurdai                                               Deep Fried Kurdai

We usually get these made from someone (usually housewives who run household business making Papads, Masalas and Pickles)- lack of time and laziness being the main reasons. 🙂

To make Kurdai, Wheat is soaked in water for three days and then finely ground. The milky white extract (it is called as Gavhacha Cheek- Gahu means Wheat and cheek means extract) is separated from the wheat skin.

This milky white extract is then cooked with water to make a soft stiff dough called Ukad, which is inturn passed through a press(Thin Sev press) to get the kurdais. These are then dried and stocked. 

The cooked soft dough used to make Kurdai is very tasty by itself- It makes for a delicious, healthy and filling snack. We call it Gavhacha Cheek. I am very fond of this Cheek and even if I don’t make Kurdais at home, I make this Cheek as an evening snack once in a while.The left over Wheat skin (Gavhacha saal; saal means skin) is used for making a scrumptious spicy Upma. 

Recipes like these are becoming almost extinct, just like sparrows. Very few households now make these authentic Maharshtrian dishes.

This is my humble attempt to keep the traditional offbeat recipes alive. 

Nupur I hope you enjoy these authentic yet offbeat recipes for Gavhacha Cheek and Gavhachya salacha Upma for RCI –Maharshtrian Cuisine 

_________________________________________________________                                                            Gavhacha Cheek recipe

Servings :~ 4-5 _____________________________________________________ 

Ingredients:

5-6 Cups Whole wheat (the older the better)

½ tsp Cumene powder

¼ tsp Asafoetida powder

Salt to taste      

 1. Soak Wheat in water for 3 days changing the water everyday.

2. After 3 days finely grind the wheat till all the wheat grains are properly crushed and the milky extract separates out.

3. Take some water (about 3-4 cups) in a large vessel and add the crushed wheat to it. Remove the wheat skin with your hands and squeeze tightly so that the milky extract remains in the water and the skin is separated. Repeat this procedure one more time with fresh water –put the skin in another lot of freah water (3-4cups) and squeeze out the extract with your hands.

4. Take a thin fresh clean cotton cloth and filter the extract through it. Use your hand to press the liquid through the cloth.

5. Don’t throw the Wheat skin. Keep it aside.

6. Keep the Milky extract (Cheek) covered overnight.

7. A layer of thin yellowish watery liquid can be seen on the dense White Cheek which is settled at the bottom.Discard the supernatant water and measure the lower dense Cheek using a cup. (You may need a spoon to remove the white cheek since it is quite dense.

8. Boil equal amount of water in a pan and add little salt, cumene powder and Asafoetida.

9. When the water comes to a rolling boil, add the Cheek to it with one hand and stir with a wooden spatula with your other hand, taking care that no lumps are formed.

10. Cook till the milky white cheek becomes translucent. Cover and cook for a few minutes more stirring in between.

11. Serve hot.

12. This can also be served by adding a little sugar and milk on top, but I prefer it as it is.

 

_________________________________________________________                                                            Gavhachya Salacha Upma recipe

Servings: ~ 3-4 _____________________________________________________ 

Use the leftover Wheat skin from the Gavhacha Cheek to make this slightly sour and spicy Upma. 

Heat oil in a pan. Do the tadka (mustard seeds, cumene seeds, curry leaves, green chillies-in that order). Add some chopped onion and fry till translucent. Add the leftover wheat skin and cook covered for few minutes. Stir this Upma nicely and add little fresh grated coconut. Mix well and let some moisture evaporate.

Garnish with coriander leaves and lime juice (optional). The Upma is already slightly sour so addition of lime juice depends on how sour you like it.

Serve hot.

You can also wrap it in a soft Roti and serve as a Frankie.

June 11, 2007 at 2:21 pm 41 comments

Mango Sheera (Ambyacha Sheera)

Sheera– is a traditional Maharshtrian sweet, usually served as ‘Prasad’ for Satyanarayan puja. Sheera also is an all time favourite breakfast for many Maharashtrians.

If you have unexpected guests and have not time to cook up any other sweet Sheera is a very good way of showing them you care! And Sheera never lets you down… it always turns out to be good.

The Sheera that is made for ‘Prasad’ usually has slices of banana in it.

I made Mango Sheera (Ambyacha Sheera) for my little one on his birthday, who like me does not have a sweet tooth but enjoyed this Mango Sheera very much. 

I hope the lovely Padmaja of Spicy Andhra likes it too, since I am sending this good old Mango Sheera for her debut Event (as a host ) WBB#11 –‘Summer Fruits’. Thanks Padmaja for hosting WBB with such a sunny and fresh theme J

mangosheera.jpg

__________________________________________________________                                                            Mango Sheera recipe

Servings :5-6 _____________________________________________________ 

Ingredients:

 1 ½ cups Rava/Semolina (medium coarse)

 1 ½  cups Milk

1 ½ cups water

1 cup ripe Mango pulp

1 cup sugar

~ 2 tbsp homemade Ghee 

For the garnishing:

6-7 Cashewnuts chopped

10-12 golden raisins

Few strands of Saffron, soaked in warm milk 

(Usually we measure ingredients using Vati or Katori in our kitchens. Cups are used only for measuring ingredients for cakes. I have changed the measures here to cups since it is easy to understand for everyone.) 

In a heavy bottom Kadai/wok heat 2tsp of the ghee. Fry the cashew nut pieces and raisins in it, drain and keep aside. In the same ghee, roast the Rava/semolina till it turns golden brown and you get a nice smell of roasted Rava. Remove in a plate and cool.

In the same Kadai mix milk and water and bring to a boil. Add the roasted rava and cook stirring continuously so that no lumps are formed. Cook on low flame for some time stirring in between.

 After the Rava is half cooked add sugar. Mix properly and cook for a few minutes more, stirring in between.

Add the mango pulp ,mix nicely so that the pulp get mixed up homogenously. Cook till all the liquid has been absorbed.

Add the remaining ghee (optional) and the saffron strands dissolved in warm milk. Mix nicely. Saffron adds to the lovely ‘Mango’ colour of this Sheera.Cover and cook for a 1-2 minutes.  

Garnish with the fried Cashew pieces and golden raisins. 

Variation: You can use Pineapple instead of mango to make Pineapple Sheera.

May 24, 2007 at 10:28 am 13 comments

Ambadichi Bhaji (Sour greens curry)

 ambadichibhaji.jpg

       Ambadichi Bhaji (Sour greens curry)

Type Comfort in MS word, select it, right click and see the synonyms: Soothe , console, reassure, calm, relieve ..This Ambadichi Bhaji (Sour greens/Gongura curry) makes every synonym for comfort sound true:

½        Soothes your palette

½        Consoles you when you are feeling low

½        Reassures you when you dearly miss your mom’s cooking

½        Calms you down when you are upset

½        Relieves your stress

Yes this is one of the recipes I rely on when I am in need of some ‘Comfort food’ (of course provided the greens are available).

ambadileaves.jpg

       Ambadi/sour greens/Gongura leaves

Ambadi leaves are sour -almost vinegary to taste. But this tartness is what makes them so tasty and special. I read here that these greens come in two varieties- Red stemmed and Green stemmed. Here we usually get the green stemmed variety, so I have used that. What makes this a quintessentially Maharashtrian recipe is the use of Jowar Kani (broken Jowar grains). The Ambadi leaves are stemed together with the Jowar Kani to make this very special Ambadichi bhaji -which makes me nostalgic and reminds of my mom’s or my granny’s cooking each and everytime I make it.

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Ambadichi Bhaji

Servings :about 3-4

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 Ingredients:

1 big bunch Ambadi leaves (cleaned,washed and chopped)

1 cup Jowar (Sorghum/White millet) grains

2tbsp Toovar dal (arhar dal/yellow lentils), soaked in water for ½ hour

2tbsp Peanuts soaked in water for ½ hour

Salt as per taste

For the tadka:

8-10 garlic cloves peeled and crushed

2-3 tsp oil

½ tsp cumene seeds

½ tsp mustard seeds

1-2 tsp Red chilli powder (adjust to your taste) 

To make the Jowar Kani:

kani.jpg

     Jowar Kani/Broken Jowar Grains

Coarsely grind the Jowar grains in the mixer for few seconds. Tranfer to a sieve (used to sieve atta or Maida). Remove the powder which falls at the bottom (this flour can be added to the usual jowar flour for making Bhakris, or add this to the usual Roti atta)Use the broken jowar kani which remains in the sieve to make Ambadichi Bhaji. If any unbroken jowar grains are left in the sieve, run them once again in the mixer and repeat the above procedure. Soak the Jowar Kani in water for ½ hour along with the Toovar dal and peanuts. 

 To make the Bhaji:

Steam the chopped Ambadi leaves and the soaked Toovar dal, Peanuts and Jowar Kani. For steaming I use a stainless steel sieve kept on a steamer-a deep vessel filled with 1/3 water. Alternatively you can use a pressure cooker without the whistle. Cover the sieve and steam till the leaves are well cooked (takes about half an hour) 

steaming.jpg

Ambadi leaves,soaked  Jowar Kani,Toovar dal and peanuts in SS sieve for steaming

Remove the bhaji from steam,add salt and mix nicely. In a small pan heat oil ,add the mustard seeds, then the cumene seeds,then the crushed garlic. Fry nicely till your kitchen smells of the garlic, switch off the gas ,add the chilli powder and immediately pour this tadka on the bhaji so that the red chilli powder does not get charred.Mix nicely and serve with Bhakri or Roti!                    

May 15, 2007 at 1:40 pm 18 comments

Spice it up 2

Sequel’s are in fashion in Bollywood and I don’t want to be left behind especially since most of the recent sequel’s have been hits!

This is a sequel to the Red Chili Chutney (Spice it up 1) Red Chili Thecha (Spice it up 2)

The Protagonist is the same- Fiery Hot Red Chili Pepper, the treatment is a bit different and the leading lady J has changed!From the mildly flavoured,sweet Onion now it’s the strong flavoured and pungent Garlic.And since it is Garlic, I have roasted it before making the Thecha!

So here’s one more recipe Red Chili Thecha to spice up the Valentine’s Day!

redchutney2.jpg

3 Red Chili Peppers washed and stems removed

3-4 bulbs small fresh garlic bulbs (I have used fresh green garlic as shown in the photo alternatively you can use 5-6 garlic cloves

2 tsp lemon juice

Salt as per taste 

For the Tadka:

1tsp oil

½ tsp Mustard seeds 

Roast the Chili peppers directly on a low Flame.(Pierce a fork in each Pepper and Roast it.) Similarly Roast the Garlic bulbs.If you don’t have the patience to roast each Pepper and garlic bulb chop the peppers and garlic bulbs and roast them in a pan with 1 tsp oil.Cool the peppers and garlic.Pound together the Red pepper and garlic to a coarse paste adding salt as required using a mortar and pestle. You can also coarsely grind it in a mixer. I prefer the taste using Mortar and pestle.Remove the Thecha in a bowl and add lemon juice. Mix properly and add the Tadka. (Heat oil in a pan and add the mustard seeds)

Mix well and serve with Bhakri or Paratha or Roti. This Thecha can stay upto 1 month if refrigerated but then who wants to keep it for a month! J

February 11, 2007 at 10:41 am 2 comments

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