Posts filed under ‘curry leaves’

Rajasthani Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi for Regional Indian Home cooking

Happy New Year to all the readers of My Foodcourt!

New Year 2016

After all the festive binge eating, it is time now to get back to simple hearty meals. My friend Garima has a recipe for a comforting Rajastahni Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi, perfect for the nippy weather.

I met Garima when she was staying in Nasik. I was thrilled to discover another food blogger from Nasik! But by the time we actually met, sadly it was time for her to move to Bombay. We met just for a couple of hours and we connected instantly. I felt like we have known each other forever! She has some fabulous Rajasthani recipes on her blog Café Garima and I have bookmarked many of them.

Here’s Garima with her authentic Rajasthani  Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi for my series on Regional Indian Home cooking.

Narli Bhaat 054

Hello! I am Garima and blog at Café Garima. I am delighted to be doing a regional guest post for Madhuli at her lovely blog ‘My Foodcourt’. A great admirer of Madhuli’s gorgeous pictures and unusual recipes, I am fortunate enough to have met her and cherish the beautiful couple of hours we spent together.

It is indeed, a pleasure to be here. Thanks for having me over Madhuli!

Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi

I present a traditional recipe from Rajasthan, Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi. I have fond childhood memories of Ma extracting butter from malai (cream) collected over a fortnight from atop the milk.  Kadhi was then made from the buttermilk, which was left behind after having extracted the butter. It is a tradition I have carried on in my household.

Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi1

Kadhi made from fresh buttermilk has a lovely earthy flavour. Moong dal nuggets or mangodis are added to the buttermilk curry as it cooks and roasted papads/poppadums are added at the end. A tempering of asafoetida and mustard seeds completes this very Rajasthani delight, very apt for a winter afternoon.  Here is how I make it.

Papd Mangodi Kadhi Recipe
(Serves 4)
Ingredients
For the Kadhi
3 cups of  buttermilk/ 1 cup of curd  + 2 cups of water, beaten till smooth
2 Tbsp besan/gram flour
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp haldi/ turmeric powder
¼ cup mangodi
2-3 papads

For the tempering
1 Tbsp ghee
4-5 curry leaves
1 tsp rai/mustard seeds
¼ tsp jeera/cumin seeds
½ tsp red chilli powder

Method

Before you begin making the Kadhi, ensure that the buttermilk is at room temperature.

In a heavy bottomed vessel/kadhai add the salt and turmeric to the buttermilk  and mix well, ensuring there are no lumps. Bring this mixture to a boil stirring continuously. Once the mixture has reached a rolling boil, reduce the heat and cook covered for 25 minutes. Keep adding water in case the mixture gets too thick. About 20 minutes into the cooking time, add the mangodi and half a cup of water. Cook till mangodi is done. Take off the flame. Break the roasted papads into large pieces and add to the kadhi.
To temper, heat ghee and add asafoetida, mustard seeds and cumin to it. Once the mustard begins to crackle, take off the heat and add curry leaves and red chilli powder. Spread over the Kadhi. Serve hot over rice or will chapatti.

Kadhi

January 5, 2016 at 6:10 pm 2 comments

Desi Health Bites – Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas

I love experimenting with different grains and flours. Jowar, Nagli/Ragi,Amaranth, Corn etc.. are pantry staples in my house. Most of the times,I use a blend of these grains for our day-to-day food in the form of khichdis, upmas,dosas.

One such multipurpose, wholesome flour mix is the ‘Thalipeeth Bhajani. This is a pantry staple in every Maharashtrian household.

IMG_3083

Bhajani Thalipeeth basically is a quick flat bread made using this multigrain Bhajani mix along with chopped onions,sometimes some chopped fresh or leftover vegetables, fresh coriander, sesame seeds and spices.It is usually served for breakfast with fresh homemade Curd/Yogurt, homemade white butter and/or sweet lime pickle.

IMG_3514

My Mom makes her own Thalipeeth Bhajani by roasting – Jowar, Bajra, wheat, Nagli,Rice,Gram dal,Urad dal and cumene , coriander seeds and then milling them together. Needless to say I get my Thalipeeth Bhajani mix  readymade from her as and when I am out of stock :). Most supermarkets, grocery stores, health food shops now stock Thalipeeth flour, so it is easily available or see the Quick Mix version given below.

Another favourite item from the Maharashtrian cuisine is ‘Khamang Kakdi’ – cucumber salad tempered with spices and topped with crushed peanuts. I love to add Tomatoes and onion to my Khamang Kakdi.

IMG_3205

Both these Classic Maharashtrian favourites, I have combined in a quick modern Appetizer Avatar- Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas, akin to the Mexican Tostadas.

Thalipeeth Tostadas 2

It seems to be a long winded recipe but it uses simple day-to-day ingredients found in most Indian kitchens.With some advance preparation it can be easily put together in under 30 minutes.

I have used Fortune Rice Bran Health Oil for making my  Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas.

“Fortune rice bran health oil has a key micronutrient called “oryzanol”, an antioxidant found only in the bran of rice. It helps reduce bad cholesterol,increase good cholesterol and keeps your heart healthy, making it a healthier choice.

Squalene is an organic compound naturally produced by human skin cells and is a natural moisturizer. Fortune Rice Bran Health Oil contains good amounts of it which prevent the ageing of skin.

Antioxidants improve health by fighting free radicals that harm the immune system. Fortune Rice Bran Health oil has natural antioxidants that help build strong immunity”.

Fortune Rice Bran Oil

“It is a myth that colourless or transparent oils are healthier than dark oils. FRBH is refined optimally to keep all the essential micronutrients intact. It has a darker appearance primarily due to Oryzanol.

It is enriched with a gamut of nutrients and is good for heart, immunity, skin and hormones. It is appropriate for people of all ages”

thalipeeth tostadasHere’s the recipe for my Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas

Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas

Makes about 18-19, 3” round Tostadas

Prep time: 20 mins

Cooking time: ~30 mins including baking time

Ingredients

For the Tostados

2 Cups Thalipeeth flour/Multigrain flour *

1 tsp Ajwain/Carom seeds

2 tsp Sesame seeds

½ tsp Dry red chilli powder (or to taste)

2 tsp Fortune Rice Bran Health Oil

2 Tbsp chopped fresh coriander leaves

¼ tsp garlic paste

½ tsp Asafoetida/hing

Warm water as required (~ ¾-1 cup)

For the topping

1 large cucumber peeled finely chopped

1 large Tomato ,seeds removed & finely chopped

½ onion finely chopped

3 tsp roasted peanuts crushed

2 tsp chopped fresh coriander leaves

½ tsp brown sugar

Salt to taste

For tempering

2 tsp Fortune Rice Bran Health Oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

½ tsp Cumene seeds

5-6 Curry leaves

½ tsp powdered Asafoetida

1-2 green chillies chopped

For the herbed Yogurt/Curd

¾  cup thick Yogurt/curd

2 tsp chopped mint leaves

2 tsp chopped coriander leaves

Rock salt to taste

Method

For the Tostados

Preheat the oven to 170 deg C.

Line a baking sheet with Parchment paper.

Add the flour or flours to a mixing bowl.

Add all the other ingredients except the water.Mix well.

Slowly add the warm water and knead the flours into a stiff but pliable dough.

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface.

Roll out into a thin layer. The layer should be as thin as possible while still workable.

Cut rounds using a 3” cookie cutter/ sharp edge of a small steel Dabba.

Transfer to the prepared baking sheet and bake till they turn golden around the edges – ~15-20 minutes. (Keep an eye on them after about 12 minutes as they burn easily.)

Cool completely on a wire rack.

Note: These can be made well in advance. Can be stored in an air tight container for about 2 weeks.

For the topping-Koshimbir

Mix the cucumber, tomatoes, onions in a bowl.

Add the crushed peanuts, salt,sugar and mix

In a small Kadhai/pan add the oil.

Once hot, add the mustard seeds.

Once the mustard seeds crackle, add the cumene seeds, Asafoetida, curry leaves and green chillies.

Pour this over the Cucumber-tomato-onion mixture in the bowl.

Add the chopped coriander and mix again.

Note: The veggies can be chopped in advance but mix everything just before serving and use immediately

For the Herbed Yogurt/Curd

In a small bowl mix together the Yogurt and the herbs.

Season with Rock salt and mix well.

To Assemble the Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas

Keep the crispy Thalipeeth Tostadas on a large serving plate.

Add 1½- 2 spoonfuls of the Koshimbir Topping.

Top with a dollop of the herbed Yogurt

Serve immediately

Other serving suggestions:

You can use Sweet Lime pickle along with the juice, or a coriander-mint chutney or the Marathi Red/Green Chilly Thecha instead of the herbed Yogurt

Thalipeeth Tostadas 1

*Make your own multigrain Quick Thalipeeth flour mix:  ½ cup Wheat flour+ ¼ cup Rice flour+ ¼ cup Ragi/Nagli flour+ ¼ cup Jowar flour+1/4 cup Bajra flour+ ¼ Besan/chickpea/Gram flour+ ¼ cup Urad Dal/Black lentil flour + ½ tsp roasted cumene powder+ ½ tsp coriander seed powder

This blogpost is in association with Fortune Foods as a part of their Desi Health Bites activity– The Hunt for the Best Rice Bran Oil Recipes. For more updates and healthy recipes using Fortune Rice Bran Health Oil, follow Fortune Foods on Facebook and on Twitter at @fortunefoods

March 16, 2015 at 10:00 am 1 comment

Ambe Dal

The Mango Mania refuses to leave us. First the tangy green raw mangoes and now the luscious ripe ones. I am still hooked on to the raw mangoes and have been using them in every way I can.

Ambe Dal is a traditional Maharashtrian preparation, specially made during these hot summer days when green Mangoes are abundant. It’s super quick and easy to make (with the exception that you need to soak the dal in advance) and requires just a few easily available ingredients.

The tart raw mangoes are grated and added to coarsely ground soaked chana dal (split Bengal gram). This mixture is then flavoured with a spicy tadka (tempering) of Red chillies, curry leaves and asafoetida . I personally love the flavor of asafoetida .

This cool,tangy-spicy Ambe Dal is served on a banana leaf along with Aam Panha (recipe here)

Here’s the recipe for Ambe Dal

Ingredients

1 cup Chana dal (split Bengal gram) soaked in water for 5-6 hours

½ raw mango, peeled and grated (depending on the tartness the amount can be adjusted)

½ tsp sugar

Salt to taste

For the tadka (tempering)

3tsp oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

½ tsp cumene seeds

5-6 curry leaves

Pinch of asafoetida

1-2 dry Red chillies broken into pieces

Method

Rinse and Drain the soaked Chana dal.

Grind the dal coarsely .

Add the grated mango, salt and sugar .

In a small wok/pan heat the oil.

Add the mustard seeds and once they splutter add the cumene seeds.

Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and the red chillies.

Add this tadka over the Mango Dal mixture and mix nicely .

Cool and serve on a banana leaf along with Aam Panha. I love to ‘cool this dal in the refrigerator for half an hour and then serve.

May 9, 2012 at 12:57 pm 7 comments

Tomato Saar

Tomato Saar is a quintessential Maharashtrian preparation, also a ‘must have’ dish for most of our festive fares.

Tomato is paired with coconut and then tempered with a few spices to make a sweet-spicy-tangy ‘soup’ usually as an accompaniment to steamed rice, although it can also be served like a soup on its own.

Every Maharashtrian household has a ‘unique’ recipe for Tomato Saar.  This recipe is my mom’s and I have followed exactly as she makes it. (I am surprised that after all these years I have missed blogging about it here on My Foodcourt!)

In other news, after my earlier rant about the camera, the DSLR is finally home and being played with. I am still discovering the unlimited features, so you will soon see a lot of my ‘discoveries’ with the same either here on the blog or on the FB page here.

Back to my mom’s recipe for Tomato Saar:

(This makes about 13-14 cups of saar)

Ingredients

9-10 medium sized ripe red tomatoes

3/4th  cup fresh grated coconut

2 ½ tsp grated jaggery (or more according to sweetness desired)

½ tsp red chilli powder (optional)

Salt to taste

For the tempering:

2 tsp Ghee/oil (homemade ghee tastes the best)

1 tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp cumene seeds

1/4 tsp asafetida (a pinch)

1-2 dry red chillies broken into pieces

10-12 curry leaves torn into pieces with hand

Chopped coriander leaves for garnishing

Method:

Cook the tomatoes in a pressure pan until soft and they lose their ‘rawness’ (one whistle and then 5 mins on sim)

Meanwhile grind the coconut to a fine paste using little water.

Once the tomatoes are cooked, cool and remove skin and chop off the head.

Grind the tomatoes along with the coconut to a smooth paste. The coconut and tomatoes should blend together.

You can sieve the paste through a mesh at this stage. I like to skip this step and directly use the paste as it is.

Add sufficient water to the paste to bring it to a soupy consistency.

Add the jaggery,salt and chilli powder and bring it to a boil.

In a small pan/kadai, heat the ghee/oil.

Add the mustard seeds.

Add the cumene seeds once the mustard seeds splutter.

Switch off the gas and add the asafetida, curry leaves and the red chillies.

Add this tempering to the saar.

Garnish with fresh chopped coriander leaves and serve with hot rice or just as it is like a soup.

March 18, 2012 at 3:29 pm 20 comments

Pepper away the Monsoon blues with this quick and simple Black pepper Rasam/soup

The medicinal uses of Black pepper are well known. It is one of the trusted home remedies for cold and cough. We have been surviving the Monsoon bug by adding this ‘natural antibiotic‘ to our day-to -day meals.

We are having this hot spicy Pepper Rasam/ soup almost every day to soothe our itchy throats; a soothing balm to ‘shoo’ away the Monsoon blues.

This is of course my Mother-in-law’s recipe and uses very few day-to-day ingredients; Black pepper-cumene seeds –some dried coconut and curry leaves. You can make a ready spice mix and store in an airtight container. Whenever you want to make the rasam just boil some lentils add the ready spice mix and viola! your ‘magic potion’ is ready in minutes

Here’s the recipe for Pepper Rasam/Soup

Things required:

¼ cup Toovar Dal (pigeon pea lentils)

8-10 Black pepprcorns

~2 tsp Cumene seeds

~ 1 tbsp dried coconut grated

4-5 curry leaves

Pinch of turmeric and few drops of oil to cook the Lentils

Salt to taste

1 tsp homemade ghee

Method:

Pressure cook the dal with ~ 2 ½ cups  of water, a pinch of turmeric and 3-4 drops of oil.

In a pan dry roast black peppercorns, cumene seeds, dried coconut and curry leaves one by one.

Cool and coarsely grind the spices in a mortar and pestle.

Heat ghee in a deep pan.

Add the spice mix.

Add the cooked dal along with the water. Adjust the consistency of water to your liking.

Season with salt and boil for few minutes.

Serve piping hot.

Notes:

You can adjust the spices to your taste, it is a very forgiving recipe.

You can skip the ghee if you don’t want it, just mix the spices and the dal and boil together.

If you plan to serve this as a clear soup, let the soup stand for a few minutes and then just pour out the liquid. You can use the leftover dal to make some dal parathas or sambar

You can zest up the soup with a dash of lime juice

August 12, 2010 at 1:57 pm 9 comments

Comfort food-Poha(beaten rice) spiced with Methkut

I was feeling a bit under the weather for the past few days. The wet rainy days did not help to lift up my spirits. Elaborate cooking took a back seat and it was time for some quick easy meals.

Poha (beaten rice) is a must-have ingredient for all Maharashtrian pantries. It is a regular item on the ‘essential items’ in the monthly grocery list. Poha is a handy ingredient when you have unexpected guest, you are pressed for time, need a quick meal or when you want some comfort food!

The modest Poha is dressed up here with a few spices and a classic Methkut powder to make one of the most delightful comfort foods for me.

The recipe is quite forgiving and does not need any pre-planning. Day-to-day ingredients are used and it can be made at the last minute.

The key ingredient used to flavor this Spicy Poha is a Methkut. Methkut is a classic powder made from a few dals and spices and is used in most Maharashtrian households to flavour soft cooked rice; again a comfort food and one with lot of childhood memories.

I used readymade Methkut powder but you can find recipes here and here.

This spiced Poha makes a great tea time snack along with a cup of spiced Chai or a glass of freshly brewed filter coffee.

Here’s the recipe:

2 cups Thin poha (beaten rice)

2-3 tbsp Methkut powder

3-4 tsp coconut water /buttermilk/milk or just plain water

Pinch of sugar

Salt to taste

For the tadka (tempering):

A handful of peanuts

A handful of roasted Chana dal (Dalia)

4-5 dry Red chillies cut  into pieces

4-5 curry leaves torn into pieces

1 tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp cumene seeds

½ tsp turmeric powder

~2-3 tbsp oil 

For the garnish:

Lime Juice

Fresh coriander leaves 

Method:

Sprinkle coconut water/buttermilk/milk or just plain water on the poha and mix to make it a little moist.

Add the methkut, salt and sugar and mix nicely to coat the poha. (Adjust the amount of Methkut to your taste).Keep it aside.

Heat oil in a small pan.

Add the mustard seeds and once they splutter add the cumene seeds followed by the peanuts.

Fry the peanuts well and then add the roasted chana dal.

Add in the turmeric powder, Red chilles and curry leaves.

Add this tadka\tempering to the poha and mix nicely.

Keep covered for a ~ 5 minutes for all the flavours to mingle.

Garnish with lime juice and coriander leaves.

Variation: If you cannot find Methkut you can use the Chutney podi which is normally served with dosa.

Or I have blogged about another version of spicy Poha (Dadpe Pohe) earlier on My Foodcourt here.

 Also see Poha spiced with Tamarind

July 15, 2010 at 2:53 pm 8 comments

Lemon Rice

Nothing is as refreshing as lemon in this scorching heat , even if the lemon is in the rice! Lemon rice is just the right recipe for these hot summer days. The tangy lime juice peps up the humble rice. This is my mother-in –laws recipe (like all other south Indian recipes on this blog) and I love the way vegetables are added to the Lemon rice making it a wholesome meal by it. Here I have added green beans but I sometimes add capsicum too. 

Lemon Rice recipe:

2 cups cooked rice, (add salt while cooking the rice)

Juice of 2 lemons (or as tart as you like)

1 cup chopped green beans

4-5 green chilles chopped

2-3 tsp Chana dal

7-8 curry leaves

2tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp turmeric powder

3-4 tsp oil oil

Salt to taste

Method:

Heat oil in a pan/wok.

Add the mustard seeds

Once they splutter add the chillies-curry leaves-turmeric powder- Chana dal.

Add salt (remember the rice also has salt!)

Add the green beans, mix well, cover and cook for a few minutes.

Add this beans mixture to the cooked rice. Mix nicely till the mixture coats the rice.

Add the lime juice, adjust the salt if required.

Serve immediately.

Lemon rice can be accompanied by some salad or rasam.

March 23, 2010 at 12:18 pm 4 comments

Dadpe Pohe (Spiced Beaten Rice)

This is a long pending post; so long that my friend S asked me to post it when I started blogging; and that was more than a year ago!

Dadpe Pohe is one of those dishes which ‘no-one can eat just once’ – Very addictive. I can eat bowls of this when it is made; hope all of you like it too.

S Dadpe Pohe specially for you from this Sudama! J 

poha3.jpg _________________________________________________________ Dadpe Pohe recipe

Serving: 1 person; if you are like me otherwise it serves 2

_____________________________________________________ 

 pohaingredients.jpg

2 cups/2 Vati(Katori)/2 Handfuls thin Poha (beaten Rice)

1 onion chopped

½ – 1 cup scrapped fresh coconut

1 small piece ginger grated

Salt to taste

½ tsp sugar

3-4 tsp coconut water 

For the tadka (tempering):

A handful of peanuts

4-5 green chillies chopped

4-5 curry leaves torn into pieces

1 tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp cumene seeds

~3-4 tsp oil 

For garnishing:

Lime Juice

Fresh coriander leaves  

†Microwave the Poha for ~ 1 minute or alternatively roast them till crisp or keep them in hot sun till crisp.

†Cool the Poha and sprinkle the coconut water to make it a little moist. You can alternatively use buttermilk .

†Add the chopped onion, grated ginger, freshly scrapped coconut, salt and sugar , mix nicely and keep aside covered.

†In a pan heat the oil.

†Add the mustard seeds.

†Once they splutter add the cumene seeds.

†Add the peanuts and fry nicely till crispy.

†Add the green chillies and curry leaves.

†Add this tadka/tempering to the Poha.

poha2.jpg

†Mix nicely and keep it covered for 10-15 minutes. This helps for the Poha to ‘Set’ nicely (all the flavours mingle nicely with the poha) If you are in a hurry you can serve immediately.

†Garnish with fresh coriander leaves and lime juice. 

poha4.jpg

October 3, 2007 at 11:06 am 23 comments

Phodnichi Poli (Resurrected Leftover Roti)

A very popular Maharashtrian breakfast is Phodnichi Poli. Leftover Rotis (Poli as it is called in Marathi) from previous night are recycled the next morning for breakfast, by dressing them up with some spicy tadka (tempering).

I also add some available veggies to make it tastier and healthier. Nothing is as comforting as a hot spicy Phodnichi Poli for breakfast!

You can also substitute Rotis with leftover Rice, Bhakris or Bread to make Phodnicha Bhaat (Rice), Phodnichi Bhakri or Bread chi Bhaji/chivda respectively!

Like many fusion recipes in my kitchen I love to sprinkle some Chutney Podi on my Phodnichi Poli to give it a fusion- Maharashtrian-South Indian taste! J

phodnichi-poli.jpg

Phodnichi Poli can be called the ‘Queen of leftovers’ and hence I am sending it to dear Nandita’s  WBB#15- Breakfast from leftovers

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Phodnichi Poli recipe

_____________________________________________________ 

7-8 leftover Rotis (Polis)

1-2 carrots grated (you can use beans, cauliflower, peas, tomatoes etc.)

1 onion chopped

4-5 green chillies slit and cut into pieces

5-6 curry leaves

2 tsp Urad Dal (white lentil)

A handful of peanuts

½ tsp mustard seeds

½ tsp cumene seeds

½ tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp sugar

Salt to taste 

For the garnishing:

Coriander leaves

Lime juice

Chutney Podi (optional) 

† Tear and crush the Rotis with your hands. Or if they are dry enough use a food processor to tear them to pieces.

† Add salt and sugar to the crushed Rotis and keep aside.

† Heat oil in a pan.

† Do the tadka (tempering). Mustard seeds- cumene seeds- turmeric powder- curry leaves

† Add the peanuts and the Urad dal and fry for a few minutes till the peanuts are fried nicely

† Add the green chillies and the chopped onions. Fry till the onions turn translucent.

† Add the grated carrot and cook for a few more minutes.

† Add the crushed Rotis, mix nicely and cook covered for 4-5 minutes stirring in between.

† Garnish with coriander and lime juice. Serve hot.

† My favourite combo is to eat Phodnichi Poli with a bowl of curd. 

                         hgfehgfehgfehg 

Another recycling idea with leftover Rotis – a must eat for people with a sweet tooth :Crush the Rotis with your hands as above. Add little ghee, crushed jaggery and some sesame seeds. Mix nicely and make small balls like ladoos from this mixture. 

These resurrected Rotis will take no time to vanish! J

                        hgfehgfehgfehg 

A few more leftover recipe ideas on My Foodcourt 

BhakriCha Kala

Sandwich

Stuffed Dinner Rolls

                         hgfehgfehgfehg

September 27, 2007 at 9:51 am 14 comments

Bendekay (Bhindi/Okra) Gojju

Thank you all of you for your wishes, I am feeling much better now.

South Indian food was restricted to Idli-Sambar-Dosa- chutney- Rasam that was till I got married.

After marriage I learnt so many wonderful recipes from my mother-in-law, not just idli-dosa etc.. but some really nice curries, rice and Rotis.

Ajay’s family hails from Bangalore ;Iyengars settled in Karnataka for generations together (and now he is settled in Maharashtra). It’s a fine blend of Tamilian + Kannadiga cuisine, and now my addition- +Maharashtrian cuisine. So we have some very hybrid recipes cooked in our kitchen!

This is a nice recipe for Bendekay(Bhindi/Okra) Gojju; of course my mother-in-law’s recipe.

Bhindi/ okra is cooked in tamarind pulp along with jaggery and some rasam powder (Malkapudi). It thus has all three tastes; sweet, sour and spicy. This recipe is especially good when you have less amount of Bhindi and more amount of people eating it or when the Bhindi is not very fresh and you need to dress it up! J

bendekay-gojju.jpg 

Bendekay(Bhindi/Okra) Gojju my second entry to Asha’s RCI Karnataka. 

rci-karnataka.jpg

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Bendekay (Bhindi/Okra) Gojju recipe _____________________________________________________ ½ kg Bhindi/okra/ Ladies finger – washed, towel dried, ends removed and chopped into small round discs.~ 1 tbsp tamarind pulp

2 tbsp crushed jaggery

 2 tsp Rasam powder (Malkapudi)

¼ tsp asafoetida (hing) crushed

7-8 fresh curry leaves

½ tsp cumene seeds

½ tsp mustard seeds

¼ tsp turmeric powder

2 tsp oil

Salt to taste

Heat oil in a pan.

Do the tadka mustard seeds- cumene seeds- turmeric powder and then the curry leaves and asafoetida.

Add the Bhindi and fry nicely. 

Cook for a few minutes and then add the tamarind pulp, jaggery, salt and the Rasam (Malkapudi) powder.

Mix nicely and add little water if the pulp is too thick.

Cook uncovered till the Bhindi is cooked nicely.

Serve hot with Rice of Roti.

 

September 19, 2007 at 2:48 pm 12 comments

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