Posts filed under ‘gram flour’

My Foodcourt turns 10! We are celebrating with the prize winning recipe for Microwave Borscht with Golay!

Yes! My Foodcourt turns 10 today! and a recipe for Microwave Borscht with Golay- to celebrate this decade long journey,the win and good food in general!

Continue Reading August 4, 2016 at 9:18 am 2 comments

India’s Best blogger, Khadya Jatra and Khandeshi Cuisine

India’s Best blogger, Khadya Jatra and Khandeshi Cuisine….confused? …read on 🙂

2016 seems to have started on a very positive note! Betterbutter had organized ‘ India’s top blogger contest ‘.To participate we had to Curate a meal for two in a foodbook to make a complete meal. I participated and my foodbook menu included- Meetha Pan spritzer, Mini Thalipeeth Tostadas, Garam Masala spiced Palak Paneer Timbale and Meringue nests topped with Mango curd and fruits. foodbook

As you must have guessed by now, I won the India’s top blogger contest! The prize is as awesome as the concept & contest- a gorgeous orange coloured Le Creuset Casserole! Thank you again Betterbutter for this!

le crueset

The recipes are already on the blog or you can check out the foodbook and some of my recipes here on betterbutter.

Khadya Jatra: I wrote this article for a Facebook group initiated by Saee of My Jhola– Angat Pangat, which re-discovers traditional Maharashtrian cuisine. We are starting with a new series on the group called ‘Khadya Jatra’ #APKhafyaJatra ,where a specialist of a particular sub-cuisine of Maharashtra will curate some background information about it and give an authentic recipe with step by step images.Members can then try out the recipe and thus get a chance to learn about the sub-cuisine and recipes.

I am fortunate to be the first ‘specialist’ and Saee invited me to curate some information and a recipe about Khandeshi Cuisine.Thank you Saee for this,I am honoured.

Spicy, fiery gravies with a thick sinful layer of oil floating on top (tarri) -that’s a trademark Khandeshi dish for you!

Nashik (where I stay) borders the Khandesh region (some parts of present Nashik district are part of Khandesh),has a strong influence of the Khandesi cuisine and you can see specialties like Misal and Shev Bhaji dished out at every nook and corner.

The quintessential Kala Masala forms the base of most gravies (rassa) along with dry coconut (khobra), onion and garlic. These are traditionally served with Bhakri or Rice.

pasta and dubuk vade 1.jpg

Peanuts and peanut oil is also extensively used for cooking. Peanuts, small green lavangi mirchi or fiery Red mirchi, garlic are roasted on an iron griddle or directly on charcoal, pounded in a wooden mortar and pestle (Badgi-musal) to make the famed Thecha. Apart from the staple Jowar Bhakri, Kalnyachi Bhakri- Chutney is very popular with most Khandeshi’s. Kalna is a blend of Jowar + Urad and is served with a spicy peanut chutney.

2012-10-02

The Khandeshi love for eggplants need not be stressed. Be it Bharit made using large green eggplants (Jalgaoni Vangi) or small eggplants stuffed with kala masala or mashed eggplants (Ghotleli Bhaji), every Khandeshi loves this vegetable! The Ghotleli Bhaji and Dal batti are part of many festivities in most Khandeshi households.

Mande (Khandeshi version of Puran Poli) and Wheat Kheer are the popular sweets from the region.

The hot summers are utilized to make different types of Papads and Vade (Valvan) like the laborious yet rewarding Bibde.

A very popular Khandeshi preparation is Patodyachi (or Patvadya) Bhaji. Rolled out Besan flour dough is cut into strips and cooked in a spicy kala masala gravy. The other lesser known form of this preparation is called ‘Dubuk Vade’. Instead of making strips, dumplings are made from the besan batter and cooked in a similar gravy. I am guessing the name Dubuk comes from the noise it makes when a dumpling is dropped in the gravy-I am not sure of this though 🙂

Dubuk Vade 1

 It is simple, it is spicy, it is fiery, it uses Kalal masala gravy and it is absolutely lip smacking- ticking all the right boxes for typical Khandeshi, homestyle food. I have toned down the heat and oil to suit our taste; you can adjust it to yours.

Dubuk Vade 2.jpg

Here’s the recipe for Dubuk Vade

Recipe serves ~ 3-4 persons

Ingredients

For the Rassa

2 onions, sliced

¼ cup dry coconut, grated (Khobra)

4-5 garlic cloves

Handful of fresh coriander leaves, cleaned and washed

2 teaspoons Kala Masala (or to taste)

1 teaspoon Red chilli powder

½ teaspoon turmeric powder

2+2 tablespoon oil, divided (or more if you like)

2 teaspoon Cumene seeds (jeera)

Salt to taste

Water as required

For the vade (dumplings)

¾ cup Besan, sieved (gram flour)

2-3 garlic cloves, finely minced or grated

½- 1 teaspoon red chilli powder

½ teaspoon turmeric powder

¼ teaspoon asafoetida (hing)

Salt to taste

Method

To make the Rassa

Heat 2 tablespoon oil on an iron griddle or in an iron wok.

Add the onions and garlic and sauté till the onions start browning. Stir so that the onions and garlic are sautéed evenly.

Add the grated coconut and sauté till it just starts browning and starts emitting the aroma.

Add the coriander. Stir around to mix.

Take it off the heat and add the red chilli powder and kala masala.

Mix and cool completely.

Grind the masala, in a blender, using very little water to a smooth paste.

Heat the remaining oil in a saucepan/wok.

Add the cumin seeds.

Once they sizzle, add the ground masala and sauté.

Cook till the water evaporates and the oil starts oozing out, taking care not to burn the masala.

Add sufficient water (about 2 ½ -3 cups) to make a medium consistency gravy.

Season with salt and let the Rassa boil for a few minutes.

Meanwhile make the dumplings

Mix all the ingredients under dumplings. Add water to make a batter of dropping consistency (~ ½ cup)

Drop spoonfuls of the batter in the boiling Rassa, working quickly so that all the dumplings cook evenly. Add little water to the bowl/vessel in which you made the dumpling batter, whisk and add that to the gravy so that it will thicken a bit.

Cook for a few minutes till the dumplings are cooked through (about 8-10 minutes) and the gravy thickens a bit. (add water if it is too thick)

Serve hot with Jowar Bhakri or Rice, with a raw onion and lemon wedge on the side

Note: If you want that layer of oil floating on top, use more oil and chilli powder.

 

March 14, 2016 at 5:44 pm 8 comments

Rajasthani Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi for Regional Indian Home cooking

Happy New Year to all the readers of My Foodcourt!

New Year 2016

After all the festive binge eating, it is time now to get back to simple hearty meals. My friend Garima has a recipe for a comforting Rajastahni Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi, perfect for the nippy weather.

I met Garima when she was staying in Nasik. I was thrilled to discover another food blogger from Nasik! But by the time we actually met, sadly it was time for her to move to Bombay. We met just for a couple of hours and we connected instantly. I felt like we have known each other forever! She has some fabulous Rajasthani recipes on her blog Café Garima and I have bookmarked many of them.

Here’s Garima with her authentic Rajasthani  Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi for my series on Regional Indian Home cooking.

Narli Bhaat 054

Hello! I am Garima and blog at Café Garima. I am delighted to be doing a regional guest post for Madhuli at her lovely blog ‘My Foodcourt’. A great admirer of Madhuli’s gorgeous pictures and unusual recipes, I am fortunate enough to have met her and cherish the beautiful couple of hours we spent together.

It is indeed, a pleasure to be here. Thanks for having me over Madhuli!

Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi

I present a traditional recipe from Rajasthan, Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi. I have fond childhood memories of Ma extracting butter from malai (cream) collected over a fortnight from atop the milk.  Kadhi was then made from the buttermilk, which was left behind after having extracted the butter. It is a tradition I have carried on in my household.

Papad Mangodi ki Kadhi1

Kadhi made from fresh buttermilk has a lovely earthy flavour. Moong dal nuggets or mangodis are added to the buttermilk curry as it cooks and roasted papads/poppadums are added at the end. A tempering of asafoetida and mustard seeds completes this very Rajasthani delight, very apt for a winter afternoon.  Here is how I make it.

Papd Mangodi Kadhi Recipe
(Serves 4)
Ingredients
For the Kadhi
3 cups of  buttermilk/ 1 cup of curd  + 2 cups of water, beaten till smooth
2 Tbsp besan/gram flour
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp haldi/ turmeric powder
¼ cup mangodi
2-3 papads

For the tempering
1 Tbsp ghee
4-5 curry leaves
1 tsp rai/mustard seeds
¼ tsp jeera/cumin seeds
½ tsp red chilli powder

Method

Before you begin making the Kadhi, ensure that the buttermilk is at room temperature.

In a heavy bottomed vessel/kadhai add the salt and turmeric to the buttermilk  and mix well, ensuring there are no lumps. Bring this mixture to a boil stirring continuously. Once the mixture has reached a rolling boil, reduce the heat and cook covered for 25 minutes. Keep adding water in case the mixture gets too thick. About 20 minutes into the cooking time, add the mangodi and half a cup of water. Cook till mangodi is done. Take off the flame. Break the roasted papads into large pieces and add to the kadhi.
To temper, heat ghee and add asafoetida, mustard seeds and cumin to it. Once the mustard begins to crackle, take off the heat and add curry leaves and red chilli powder. Spread over the Kadhi. Serve hot over rice or will chapatti.

Kadhi

January 5, 2016 at 6:10 pm 2 comments

Hadga/Agasti Flower Bhajias

A very Happy New Year to all of you.

New Year

I am back after a looooooong silence on MyFoodcourt. As you can guess the resolution for 2015 is to blog as much I can!

I have been thinking of posting recipes for a long time. The ‘comeback recipe’ for the blog has spanned from Christmas cake to Yule log to Pavlova to a humble porridge-but only in my mind!

A trip to the older part of the city a couple of days back lead me to a treasured discovery- the edible Hadga flowers. I had a faint memory of my childhood ,of my Mom using these flowers for cooking. The lady selling these flowers was kind enough to inform me that I need to remove the bitter tasting stamens from the flowers before cooking them.

hatga 005

A chat with Mom about these flowers and she was nostalgic about how these flowers reminded her of her childhood. (Now you know where my love for these offbeat, treasured foods comes from). Mom said she makes a ‘Pith Perun’ bhaji (stir fry with Besan/chana dal flour).Our house help informed me that you can make sinful Bhajias with these flowers. The dipping mercury made the Bhajias more tempting than the stir fry …and so Bhajias were made. The stir fry has to wait its turn, but I had to blog about these treasured flowers rightaway!

hadga bhaji 053FB comments on the photo of the flowers and Google research have enlightened me that they are also known as Agasti,Bokful in other Indian languages and also that they are eaten as a vegetable in Southeast Asian countries.

hadga bhaji 001

I have used carbonated water just to make the Bhajias crispier- just plain water will be fine too.We enjoyed the crispy Hadga Bhajias sans accompaniment.

Here’s my recipe for

Hadga Flowers Bhajia

Ingredients

8-10 Hadga flowers (the younger flowers are better for Bhajias, but I had to make do with whatever I had)

½ cup Besan/Chana dal Flour

½ cup Rice flour

½ tsp Asafoetida(hing)

½ tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp Red chilli powder

½ tsp Ajawain/carom seeds (optional)

Carbonated (or plain) water to make a the batter

Salt to taste

Oil for deep frying

 Method

Heat the oil in a wok.

Remove the stamens from the flowers and keep aside.

Mix the flours, spices, Ajwain and salt in a bowl.

Add 2 tsp of the hot oil to this dry mix.

Add the carbonated water to the dry mix to make the batter (not too thick, not too thin) ~  1/4  cup

Coat each Hadga flower with the batter and deep fry on medium heat till crisp and lightly browned.

Serve immediately.

January 7, 2015 at 8:40 am 3 comments

Quick Roti Quesadilla

 A very simple way to use leftover Rotis and curries: This is a hit with my little one and he doesn’t even know he is eating beans, cauliflower, carrots!  

Left over Rotis are stuffed with vegetable mixed with soya sauce, tomato ketchup, sprinkled with cheese, drizzled with oil, toasted and cut into triangle like Quesadillas.

 The Idea for sealing the Roti edges comes from Nupur’s Aayis samosa. Thanks Nupur and your Aai for this brilliant idea.

  q3

recipeRoti Quesadilla Recipe:

 Leftover Chapatis (you need them in pairs)

Butter as required

Grated Cheese

Chickpea Flour paste in water (for sealing the edges)

Oil

For the Filling:

Cooked mixed Vegetables of your choice (I have added carrots,   cabbage, capsicum, Green beans, onion and tomatoes)

Tomato Ketchup 2 tbsp

Soya Sauce 2 tsp

Ginger Garlic paste-1tsp

Collages3
  •  Heat 1 tsp oil/butter in a pan.
  • Add ginger garlic paste.
  • Add the cooked mixed vegetables. Fry for 1-2 minutes.
  • Add salt if not already added, tomato ketchup , soya sauce and mix well. Keep Aside.
  • Spread butter on one side of the Roti.
  • Add the vegetable filling and spread, leaving ½ inch space from the sides.
  • Sprinkle cheese.
  • Apply the Chickpea flour paste on the edge of the Roti.
  • Cover with another Roti (you can apply the Chickpea paste to the edges of the 2nd Roti too)
  • Press edges using a spoon or fork.
  • Heat a flat pan and drizzle some oil.
  • Cook the Rotis on both sides till golden brown.
  • Cut quarters of the Roti-Quesadilla using a pizza cutter.
  • Serve Hot.

   Thank you for visiting My FoodCourt ..Cheers

August 12, 2009 at 7:18 pm 4 comments

Zunka

I promise this is going to be one of the last ‘themed’ recipes. I have been cooking themed food in my house for the last month or so J

Now if I repeat any vegetable in a week , Ajay thinks that’s the theme for some blog event! Now-a-days my monthly grocery/ vegetable list is also influenced by the Blog events.

Coming to Zunka-I have earlier posted about Pithla. Zunka is a drier version of this Pithla with or without vegetables. I have added Fresh green fenugreek (Methi) leaves and onion to this Zunka. You can substitute fenugreek leaves with any vegetable like cabbage, bottlegourd, capsicum or just lots of onions and coriander leaves. This type of Zunka with vegetable is also called as Pith perleli Bhaji ( Pith is flour, perleli is to sow and Bhaji is a curry- so curry with flour) in some parts of Maharastra.This week our Numerologist tells us to use Z for any recipe on our blog so here it is- Methi Zunka.

zunka.jpg

           Zunka for this week’s A to Z of Indian Vegetables

__________________________________________________________ 

Zunka recipe

For about 2-3 servings

_____________________________________________________

 1 bunch fresh fenugreek (Methi) leaves cleaned, washed and chopped

4-5 garlic cloves, crushed

2 onions chopped

½ cup Besan (gram flour/chickpea flour)

~ 4-5 green chillies chopped (or ~ 2 tsp red chilli powder)

Salt as per Taste 

For the tempering/tadka:

1 tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp cumene seeds

½ tsp turmeric powder

2-3 tsp oil  

Heat oil in a pan.

Do the tadka- mustard seeds-cumene seeds-turmeric powder.

Add the crushed garlic cloves and the green chillies.

Fry for a few seconds and add the chopped onions.

Fry till translucent and then add the fenugreek leaves and salt.

Mix nicely and cover and cook for 3-4 minutes. Some amount of moisture will be realised while cooking the fenugreek leaves. If you think the methi leaves are too dry sprinkle a little water.

Add the Besan gradually with one hand and stirring constantly with the other.

Adjust the proportion of Besan till it takes up all the moisture. (Consistency of Zunka should be dry.)

Cook for a few more seconds.

Serve hot.

Zunka teams up well with Bhakri.This Zunka with veggies is so delicious that I prefer to have it as it is -like upma!

August 2, 2007 at 12:12 pm 21 comments

Kadhi Pakoda

I have learnt quite a few dishes from my Punjabi colleague. I have already blogged about the Beetroot Kanji and Makki di Roti Sarson Da Saag, she taught me.Kadhi Pakoda is one more recipe that I have learnt from her.

The weather here is perfect for hot piping Kadhi with Pakodas – the Punjabi style.

kadhipakoda2.jpg

Kadhi is made differently in different regions in India. The Maharashtrian Kadhi is hot and spicy (will blog about it soon). The Gujrathi Kadhi is a little sweetish to taste. The famous Sindhi Kadhi is an altogether different recipe, which doesn’t use buttermilk at all.

The difference in this Punjabi Kadhi is the addition of Pakoda-of course and also the addition of onion.

I am sending this Kadhi Pakoda straight from Punjab to Richa of As Dear As Salt , who is hosting this month’s RCI

__________________________________________________________                                                            Kadhi Pakoda recipe

Serves : ~4

_____________________________________________________

For the Pakoda

~ ¾ cup Besan (gram flour)

1 onion chopped

¼ tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp Red chilli powder

1 tsp ajwain (Carom seeds)

Salt to taste

Oil for deep frying 

For the Kadhi

3 cups buttermilk. This has to be a little sour.

2 tbsp Besan (gram flour)-you can vary the proportion depending on the desired consistency of the Kadhi.

1 onion chopped

½ tsp ginger garlic paste

½ tsp methi (fenugreek) seeds

3-4 green chillies, chopped (optional)

½ tsp Red chilli powder

½ tsp mustard seeds

½ tsp cumene seeds

2 tsp oil

Coriander leaves for garnishing 

For the Pakoda

Mix all the ingredients for the Pakora except the oil.

Heat oil in a kadai/wok for frying the pakodas.

Add 1 tbsp of hot oil to the pakoda mixture.

Add water and mix nicely to make a thick batter.

Check if the oil is sufficiently hot by putting a drop of the batter in the oil.It sizzles right away and floats on the top.

Using a spoon (teaspoon) drop portions of the batter in the hot oil and fry till golden brown.

Drain on a paper napkin.  

For the Kadhi

Mix the buttermilk with the besan and blend it thoroughly, ensuring that no lumps are formed. (Use your hand and dissolve any lumps if any!)

Add salt, turmeric powder and red chilli powder.

In a wok/kadai heat oil.

Add the mustard seeds and once they crackle add the cumene seeds.

Add the fenugreek seeds and then the ginger garlic paste and the chopped green chillies

Add the chopped onions and fry till translucent.

Now add the buttermilk- besan mixture and bring to a rolling boil.

The Kadhi will thicken after a few boils.

Switch off the gas and add the Pakodas.

Garnish with coriander leaves.

Serve hot with steamed rice.

kadhipakoda1.jpg

July 12, 2007 at 5:18 pm 10 comments

Pithla

Pithla is the perennial ‘comfort food’ for most Maharashtrians. Piping hot Pithla coupled with Bhakri or Rice or Roti is like a reward after a long day at work.

This humble dish requires only a handful of simple ingredients and can be churned out within minutes. It’s a handy recipe when you are either out of stock for veggies or guests visit you unannounced or when you long for your Mom’s food!

Like every recipe Pithla has many variations. What I make is the spicy version with lots of onion, garlic and green chillies.

Depending on whether you want to serve Pithla with Rice or Bhakri/Roti, the consistency also varies. Pithla served with rice has almost watery- liquid like consistency. Semi liquid or dry Pithla goes well with Bhakri or Roti. This dry version of Pithla is alternately known as Zunka.

_________________________________________________________                                                            Pithla recipe

_____________________________________________________  

1 cup Besan/Chick pea flour/gram flour

2 onions chopped

4-5 green chillies chopped

4-5 garlic pods peeled

1” piece dried coconut (Khopra)

½ tsp Cumene seeds

½ tsp mustard seeds

¼ tsp turmeric powder

2 tsp oil

~ 2-3 cups water

Chopped coriander leaves for garnishing

Salt as per taste 

pithlaingredients.jpg

Pithla Ingredients – Coarsely ground chutney(Green chillies+garlic+cumene seeds+coconut) ,onion, Besan(chickpea flour) and granite mortar pestle for pounding

In a mortar and pestle pound (or coarsely grind in a mixie) together chopped Green chillies, garlic pods, dried coconut piece and cumene seeds. 

Heat oil in wok/kadai.

Add the mustard seeds and once they splutter add the coarsely ground chutney(Chilli-garlic).

Add the chopped onions and fry till they become translucent.

Add 2-3 cups of water and bring it to a nice rolling boil.

Add salt (at this stage, you can check the salt proportion by tasting the liquid)

Slowly add the Besan with your left hand, constantly stirring with a spoon in your right hand.

Adjust the besan proportion to the required consistency.Remember that after the Pithla cools, it becomes thicker. So keep it a little liquidish (that is actually a word in my vocabularyJ) if you want to serve it with rice.

Boil nicely for a few minutes more.

Garnish with fresh coriander leaves and serve piping hot with Bhakri/Roti/Rice.

pithla.jpg

Pithla served with Roti, Green chilli and onion

Pithla, Bhakri and Thecha served with Green chillies and Raw onion make a fabulous combination.

Don’t cut the onion. Take a small onion (preferably white onion).Break it with the base of your palm. Remove the cover and eat it…this tastes much better than the cut onion J 

This assal(meaning- hardcore) Marathi Pithla goes for RCI-Maharashtrain Cuisine hosted by- the versatile and very popular, Nupur of One Hot Stove.

 

June 25, 2007 at 2:09 pm 10 comments

Beetroot Kofta curry

The basic idea for Beetroot Kofta curry is from the magazine ‘Cooking and More’ by Tarla Dalal. I have adapted the recipe to suit our taste.

beetrootkoftacurry.jpg

As I said earlier in one of my posts Beetroot Cabbage curry, Beetroot is one of my favourite veggies and you will rarely find the absence of this vegetable in my fridge.I have slightly altered the masalas for the Beetroot koftas. The gravy/curry in the original recipe was a sweetish Makhani type of gravy.I completely changed the recipe to make a spicy Misal type of gravy.

Beetroot lends a lovely pinkish-red hue to the koftas and the spicy curry is just perfect to sensitize your taste buds.

For the Beetroot Koftas you need:

kofta.jpg

1 Beetroot washed,peeled and grated

2 Carrots washed,peeled and grated

1 Potato boiled and grated

2 tbsp besan (gram flour)

1tsp ginger paste/grated ginger

1 tsp green chili paste

½ tsp cumene powder

½ tsp coriander powder

½ tsp dry mango powder (amchur)

Salt to taste

Oil for deep frying

For the curry you need:

curry.jpg 

2 onions sliced

1 tomato blanched and pureed

½ tsp Kanda- Lasun masala (Onion Garlic masala)

1-2 sprigs fresh green coriander leaves (optional)

½ tsp Red chilli powder

½ tsp cumene seeds

For Garnishing

Fresh Coriander leaves

Lime juice 

Mix all the ingredients for the Kofta. Make small balls of this mixture and deep fry in oil. Drain excess oil from the koftas by keeping them on a tissue paper. Keep aside the crisp and lovely pinkish-red colored koftas. 

Take 1 tsp oil in a pan and add the sliced onion to it and fry nicely till they turn golden brown. Add the coriander leaves and the Kanda lasun masal.(You can add any masala of your choice-garam masala, kala masala etc) Fry 1 minute and remove from heat. Cool this mixture and blend it to a fine paste. 

Heat 2tsp oil in a pan and add this onion paste to it. Cook for 4-5 minutes till the paste turns to a golden red color stirring continuously so that it does not burn.Add the red chili powder. Add the tomato puree and fry till oil starts leaving the sides of the mixture.Add water to the desired consistency. Add salt as per taste. Let this curry boil nicely and then switch off the gas.  Just before serving add the crisp Beetroot Koftas to the hot spicy gravy and garnish with coriander leaves and lime juice.

February 22, 2007 at 2:14 pm 3 comments

Alu Vadi (Steamed Colacasia/Taro leaf rolls)

As promised earlier, I am posting this recipe for Alu Vadi (Steamed Colacasia/Taro leaf rolls).I made these almost 10 days ago and never got the time to post them. My little one keeps me busy most of the time when I am back from work. Earlier he would go to sleep by 8 –8:30 in the night and I would get some free time to blog .Now-a-days he puts me to sleep! Most of the times I doze off while trying to put him to sleep.Even to take a photograph before I leave to work has now become tricky. He gets his own plate and says ‘Mama Phofo!’ So first we take photos of his plate and then mine. Then sometimes he has the whim to click the photos! (You can see some of my pics not so artistic-that’s our joint effort!)

Anyways I am trying my best to keep blogging come what may….someday both of us will write a post together too!

Coming back to Alu Vadi,-Alu in Marathi, Arbi in Hindi and Colocasia/Taro in English. We have these plants in our kitchen garden. Alu is a very hassle free plant. It only needs good amount of water- not much pampering is required.We make curry (Alu chi Bhaji) from the Alu leaves or Alu Vadi (Steamed rolls). Both are delicious though I prefer the Vadi more.

av.jpg

For Alu Vadi you need: 

8 Alu/Colocasia/Taro leaves (use even number of leaves)

For the coating

¾th cup besan (Chick pea flour)

2 tsp tamarind pulp

1 tsp crushed jaggery

1 pinch Asafoetida

½ tsp Cumene powder

½ tsp Coriander powder

½-1 tsp red chilli powder

¼ tsp Turmeric powder

Salt as per taste

For the tempering

2 tsp oil

1 tsp cumene seeds

1 tsp fennel seeds

1 tsp sesame seeds

For the coating mix all the ingredients. Add water to make a paste (neither too thick or too thein.You should be able to coat the leaves. Almost to the consistency of Bhajjia batter) Mix the paste with hand if required ensuring that no lumps remain in the batter.Wash and dry the Alu leaves. Be careful while cutting these leaves from the stems. The stems of these leaves release some juice which stains clothes. So take care not to stain your clothes.Keep two leaves preferably of same size upside down one over the other. Using a rolling pin flatten the veins of these leaves. Apply the Besan paste all over the leaf. Once the entire leaf has been coated start rolling the leaf from the base towards the tip as shown in the picture. While rolling apply the paste on each fold to seal it properly.

av2.jpg

Similarly make 3 more rolls from the remaining 6 leaves. Steam them till done. Insert a knife and check.It should come out clean.

av1.JPG

Cool nicely. Cut them into small rolls. Arrange them in a flat dish.In a small pan heat oil, add the cumene seeds, fennel seeds and sesame seeds. Spread this tempering on the Alu vadis.

Serve this as a side dish.av3.jpg

Like I said earlier there are lot of variations to this recipe. Some people deep/shallow fry these Vadis. But I find topping them with the tempering more healthy, so I do it this way. As a variation you can also add garlic to the Besan paste used for coating. It tastes great. You can also increase the number of leaves, sandwiching the paste between each leaf.That is you can take all 8 leaves one over the other applying the paste on each leaf. Choice is yours!

December 21, 2006 at 12:21 pm 21 comments

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