Posts filed under ‘Side dishes’

Chatpata Jimmykand

Jimmykand cubes are coated with a spicy-sweet-sour sauce, satisfying all the chatpata cravings that this awesome rainy weather demands

Continue Reading August 10, 2015 at 7:21 am Leave a comment

Hadga/Agasti Flower Bhajias

A very Happy New Year to all of you.

New Year

I am back after a looooooong silence on MyFoodcourt. As you can guess the resolution for 2015 is to blog as much I can!

I have been thinking of posting recipes for a long time. The ‘comeback recipe’ for the blog has spanned from Christmas cake to Yule log to Pavlova to a humble porridge-but only in my mind!

A trip to the older part of the city a couple of days back lead me to a treasured discovery- the edible Hadga flowers. I had a faint memory of my childhood ,of my Mom using these flowers for cooking. The lady selling these flowers was kind enough to inform me that I need to remove the bitter tasting stamens from the flowers before cooking them.

hatga 005

A chat with Mom about these flowers and she was nostalgic about how these flowers reminded her of her childhood. (Now you know where my love for these offbeat, treasured foods comes from). Mom said she makes a ‘Pith Perun’ bhaji (stir fry with Besan/chana dal flour).Our house help informed me that you can make sinful Bhajias with these flowers. The dipping mercury made the Bhajias more tempting than the stir fry …and so Bhajias were made. The stir fry has to wait its turn, but I had to blog about these treasured flowers rightaway!

hadga bhaji 053FB comments on the photo of the flowers and Google research have enlightened me that they are also known as Agasti,Bokful in other Indian languages and also that they are eaten as a vegetable in Southeast Asian countries.

hadga bhaji 001

I have used carbonated water just to make the Bhajias crispier- just plain water will be fine too.We enjoyed the crispy Hadga Bhajias sans accompaniment.

Here’s my recipe for

Hadga Flowers Bhajia

Ingredients

8-10 Hadga flowers (the younger flowers are better for Bhajias, but I had to make do with whatever I had)

½ cup Besan/Chana dal Flour

½ cup Rice flour

½ tsp Asafoetida(hing)

½ tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp Red chilli powder

½ tsp Ajawain/carom seeds (optional)

Carbonated (or plain) water to make a the batter

Salt to taste

Oil for deep frying

 Method

Heat the oil in a wok.

Remove the stamens from the flowers and keep aside.

Mix the flours, spices, Ajwain and salt in a bowl.

Add 2 tsp of the hot oil to this dry mix.

Add the carbonated water to the dry mix to make the batter (not too thick, not too thin) ~  1/4  cup

Coat each Hadga flower with the batter and deep fry on medium heat till crisp and lightly browned.

Serve immediately.

January 7, 2015 at 8:40 am 3 comments

karale (कारळे) /Khurasni(खुरसणी)/ Niger seeds chutney and stuffed Bhindi/Okra

Every time I put a photo of the coming soon recipe on My Foodcourt’s FB page the ‘soon’ never happens. The past month has just zoomed past me (the entire half year for that matter!). Both the kids are back to school after a two month long vacation. The little one started going to her ‘new school’, she is very happy that she finally gets to go to her dada’s school 🙂

The  hot sultry summer has given way to a breezy-rainy weather. The Monsoon has also brought with it the much awaited new season’s of Masterchef Australia and White collar – lots of things to look up to; just like this chutney.

I have been meaning to make this chutney for many days but the easy availability of a readymade/mom-made chutney kept me from making it  till now.

The chutney that I am talking about is made from karale (कारळे) / Khurasni (खुरसणी) in Marathi or as I learned from Shruti on the FB page, they are known as Niger seeds in English. More on Niger seeds here.

The seeds are pound with garlic and red chilly powder to make a very tempting fiery chutney usually eaten with bhakri, Roti or hot rice. This chutney is also used as a filling for veggies like brinjal. I did not have brinjals and hence I added the chutney to the filling I made to stuff Bhindi/okra. The result was a fantyastic tasting spicy side dish. The lad kept asking for more and failed to notice the number of Rotis that went into his tummy. 🙂

Here’s the recipe for the Niger Seeds chutney:

1 cup from karale (कारळे) /Khurasni(खुरसणी) or Niger seeds

~ 10-12 garlic pods peeled (you may use less)

2 tsp red chilli powder (you can add more)

Salt to taste

Method:

Lightly roast the Niger seeds for 1-2 minutes (take care not to burn them)

Grind/ pound together all the ingredients to a dry chutney. I started by using a wooden morter and pestle but pounding the seeds to a fine powder was taking time so gave in and used the mixer.

Serve this with hot BhakriRoti/Rice preferably with a drizzle of groundnut oil.

Recipe for stuffed Okra with Niger seed chutney:

10-12 medium sized fresh and tender Bhindi/okra, washed, dried and slit lengthwise

2 tbsp oil

Juice of half a lemon/lime

Fresh coriander leaves for garnish

For the stuffing:

2 medium sized onions peeled and grated

½ cup roasted groundnut powder

4 tsp above Niger seeds chutney

2 tsp Kanda Lasoon masala (optional.I used my mom’s.)

Salt to taste.

Method:

Mix all the ingredients for stuffing.

Stuff the okra with it.

Heat oil in a wide flat bottom nonstick pan. Add the stuffed bhindi carefully.

Cook for 3-4 minutes without stirring.

Stir carefully.

Cover and cook for the next 3-4 minutes. Add a few drops of lime juice and stir once.

Cook uncovered till done (not very soft or mushy ). If you have the time and the patience cook uncovered all the time stirring only occasionally.

Garnish with fresh coriander leaves.

Serve hot with Bhakri,Roti or Rice.

Aparna of My Diverse Kitchen has started a  series of photography exercises for amateur food photographers. See last month’s exercise for My Foodcourt here.

The theme for this month’s exercise was ‘Less is More’, which is currently my style of photography. The chutney as well as stuffed Okra/Bhindi  photos above was taken with this theme in mind.Keep it simple is currently my photography mantra too.

Thank you again Aparna for coming out with these simple but helpful themes for the exercise.

June 25, 2012 at 10:21 am 4 comments

Ambe Dal

The Mango Mania refuses to leave us. First the tangy green raw mangoes and now the luscious ripe ones. I am still hooked on to the raw mangoes and have been using them in every way I can.

Ambe Dal is a traditional Maharashtrian preparation, specially made during these hot summer days when green Mangoes are abundant. It’s super quick and easy to make (with the exception that you need to soak the dal in advance) and requires just a few easily available ingredients.

The tart raw mangoes are grated and added to coarsely ground soaked chana dal (split Bengal gram). This mixture is then flavoured with a spicy tadka (tempering) of Red chillies, curry leaves and asafoetida . I personally love the flavor of asafoetida .

This cool,tangy-spicy Ambe Dal is served on a banana leaf along with Aam Panha (recipe here)

Here’s the recipe for Ambe Dal

Ingredients

1 cup Chana dal (split Bengal gram) soaked in water for 5-6 hours

½ raw mango, peeled and grated (depending on the tartness the amount can be adjusted)

½ tsp sugar

Salt to taste

For the tadka (tempering)

3tsp oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

½ tsp cumene seeds

5-6 curry leaves

Pinch of asafoetida

1-2 dry Red chillies broken into pieces

Method

Rinse and Drain the soaked Chana dal.

Grind the dal coarsely .

Add the grated mango, salt and sugar .

In a small wok/pan heat the oil.

Add the mustard seeds and once they splutter add the cumene seeds.

Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and the red chillies.

Add this tadka over the Mango Dal mixture and mix nicely .

Cool and serve on a banana leaf along with Aam Panha. I love to ‘cool this dal in the refrigerator for half an hour and then serve.

May 9, 2012 at 12:57 pm 7 comments

Tomato Saar

Tomato Saar is a quintessential Maharashtrian preparation, also a ‘must have’ dish for most of our festive fares.

Tomato is paired with coconut and then tempered with a few spices to make a sweet-spicy-tangy ‘soup’ usually as an accompaniment to steamed rice, although it can also be served like a soup on its own.

Every Maharashtrian household has a ‘unique’ recipe for Tomato Saar.  This recipe is my mom’s and I have followed exactly as she makes it. (I am surprised that after all these years I have missed blogging about it here on My Foodcourt!)

In other news, after my earlier rant about the camera, the DSLR is finally home and being played with. I am still discovering the unlimited features, so you will soon see a lot of my ‘discoveries’ with the same either here on the blog or on the FB page here.

Back to my mom’s recipe for Tomato Saar:

(This makes about 13-14 cups of saar)

Ingredients

9-10 medium sized ripe red tomatoes

3/4th  cup fresh grated coconut

2 ½ tsp grated jaggery (or more according to sweetness desired)

½ tsp red chilli powder (optional)

Salt to taste

For the tempering:

2 tsp Ghee/oil (homemade ghee tastes the best)

1 tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp cumene seeds

1/4 tsp asafetida (a pinch)

1-2 dry red chillies broken into pieces

10-12 curry leaves torn into pieces with hand

Chopped coriander leaves for garnishing

Method:

Cook the tomatoes in a pressure pan until soft and they lose their ‘rawness’ (one whistle and then 5 mins on sim)

Meanwhile grind the coconut to a fine paste using little water.

Once the tomatoes are cooked, cool and remove skin and chop off the head.

Grind the tomatoes along with the coconut to a smooth paste. The coconut and tomatoes should blend together.

You can sieve the paste through a mesh at this stage. I like to skip this step and directly use the paste as it is.

Add sufficient water to the paste to bring it to a soupy consistency.

Add the jaggery,salt and chilli powder and bring it to a boil.

In a small pan/kadai, heat the ghee/oil.

Add the mustard seeds.

Add the cumene seeds once the mustard seeds splutter.

Switch off the gas and add the asafetida, curry leaves and the red chillies.

Add this tempering to the saar.

Garnish with fresh chopped coriander leaves and serve with hot rice or just as it is like a soup.

March 18, 2012 at 3:29 pm 20 comments

Yotam Ottolenghi’s Caponata recipe and a ‘Festive Giveaway’

The Monsoon is retreating (having a hail storm outside as I type this) but we are moving into another season of festivities. I am excited to host my first giveaway from CSN stores for the festive season.

CSN stores carries everything from Dining tables to cookware to shoes and bags .CSN stores has generously offered one lucky reader of My Foodcourt from USA and Canada a Gift certificate worth $60 to use on any of the CSN stores websites.

I would like all my readers to please leave a comment below this post letting me know what you like about this blog and what would you like to see more often on My Foodcourt. Please leave one comment per person along with your E-mail address. All you silent readers, now’s your chance to share your thoughts with me.:).

The Giveaway is restricted to USA and Canada readers and there may be international shipping charges in the case of Canadian addresses.

One lucky winner will be chosen randomly and the winner will be announced on 17th October 2010.

Here are the Giveaway details:

Gift certificate: A one-time-use certificate worth $ 60 at any of the CSN stores

How to enter: Leave a comment  with Email ID below this post letting me know what do you like about this blog and what would you like to see more often on My Foodcourt.

Giveaway closes: 16th October 2010, winner will be chosen on 17th October 2010.

Giveaway Valid for: Readers from USA and Canada (there may be international shipping charges in the case of Canadian addresses.)

A Special Thanks to CSN stores team for generously sponsoring this giveaway

§§§§§§§ ♥♥♥ ♪♪♪♪ ♥♥♥§§§§§§§

After the exciting  Giveaway now for an exciting Caponata recipe…..
Over the past few years Food blogging has changed my perspective about different cuisines. Chinese is no longer restricted to Hakka noodles and Fried Rice; Mexican is no longer just Tacos and Salsa; Italian is not just pizza and pasta. Surfing the various blogs each day has made me explore many vegetarian recipes beyond these popular dishes of that particular region.

Alessio  challenged us to make a Sicilian speciality-Caponata for this month’s Velveteer’s Challenge.

‘The 4 Velveteers was started by Aparna, Asha, Alessio and Pam, who are passionate about different cuisines and food in general. Each month, we will attempt a new dish and share our experiences and the recipes we used. If you’re interested in joining the Velveteers, please feel free to drop by our Google group
I have never made a Caponata before, so was quite intrigued by it.

Wikipedia describes Caponata as a Sicilian aubergine dish, a cooked vegetable salad made from chopped fried eggplant and celery seasoned with sweetened vinegar, and capers in a sweet and sour sauce usually served as an Antipasto.

In my quest for a simple Caponata recipe I came across this recipe by Yotam Ottolenghi. I loved the use of Harissa paste- the ‘Ottolenghi  treatment’ as the recipe says- in the traditional Caponata recipe. I had some Harissa seasoning which my brother had gifted me some time back. Also the addition of raisins was quite interesting. I did not have capers neither did I have red-wine vinegar. I skipped the capers and substituted the red-wine vinegar with white-wine vinegar. I also substituted the canned tomatoes with fresh blanched tomatoes.

The loved the array of colors that the vegetables brought to the Caponata. I love eggplants in most of its form but here the humble eggplant/ aubergine was transformed into a flavorful salad with just a few ingredients. The fresh celery leant a refreshing flavor to the Caponata and the harissa added the much desired tang. The raisins were a welcome ‘sweet’ addition to the already ‘tart-spicy’ caponata.

I also added some fresh Basil leaves, which for a change are in abundance right now. I served this delicious Caponata on Bite sized- Chilly rusks.

As recommended in the original recipe, it also makes a great sauce for pasta or couscous. It’s also delicious with cheese: try spreading it over rustic bread and topping with mature vegetarian pecorino, much like the English cheese and pickle sandwich.

I could not save the Caponata to be savored the next day but you might want to make an extra batch since it tastes better the next day!

Here’s the recipe:

Adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi ‘s Caponata recipe

Ingredients:

2 slender Eggplants/ Aubergines diced

2-3 tender celery stalks cut on an angle into slices

1 small red pepper diced

1 onion diced

~ 3 small tomatoes blanched, peeled and chopped

Few green olives sliced

3 tbsp chopped parsley

~ 2 tbsp Fresh Basil leaves chopped

2 tbsp Harissa Seasoning

1 ½ tbsp white wine vinegar

Handful of Raisins

½ tsp sugar

1 tsp Lemon juice

Salt and pepper to taste

Red Chili flakes as required (optional)

2 tbsp Olive oil+2 tbsp sunflower oil

Method:

Heat both oils in a heavy-bottom pan or a non stick pan.

Add the diced aubergines and fry for 5-6 minutes till golden brown, stirring occasionally.

Use a slotted spoon to transfer the aubergine to a colander and sprinkle with a bit of salt.

After a few minutes, transfer to soak on a paper towel.

Add the celery to the hot oil, fry for three minutes, add the pepper and cook for two minutes. Transfer to the colander, then to a paper towel.

Sauté the onion and harissa seasoning in the oil (add a little more to the pan, if needed) for seven minutes, until soft and golden.

Drain off any excess oil from the pan, add the tomatoes and vinegar, stir and bring to a simmer. Add the fried vegetables, olives and sugar, and season.

 If the mix is too dry, add a few tablespoons of water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the pan from the heat taste and adjust the seasoning.

Add the raisins.

Leave to come to room temperature, add the lemon juice and parsley,basil leaves and Red chilli flakes(if using)

Serve with sliced baguettesor garlic bread or some spicy rusks as I did.

Thanks Alessio for introducing me to the delicious Sicilian favorite, I am going to try several other versions in several different ways from now on.

Do Check out the various versions of the Caponata on the other Velveteer’s blogs:

 Aparna’s Eggplant and Fig Caponata

Asha’s Sicilian Caponata over Zatared lavash

Sarah’s Caponata- A Sicilian Relish

Veena’s Sicilian Caponata

Ken’s Caponata jam

                                      

September 29, 2010 at 4:23 pm 20 comments

A Festive Tea party

Last One month we having been celebrating one festival or the other and the festivities still continue with the Ganesh festival. I am not a typical ‘rituals person’ but enjoy the festive food that is prepared during the festivals. We have been indulging in all kinds of traditional feasts and still continuing with it maybe for another month! As my grandmother would say ‘you do not think of the calories during these feasts’. Homemade fresh sweets and savories (majority made with homemade ghee (brown butter) are stored in steel containers luring you with their delectable aromas each time you pass by! I have decided to give up concern for my growing waistline till the festivities last and indulge in the feasts without any guilt! 🙂

Last week we celebrated the festive season with some family friends over to our house for high tea. Usually this is referred to here in the local language as Faraal (snacks) instead of tea party. A variety of Indian savories and sweets are served along with tea or coffee. Given our guests’ festive diet restrictions we decided to have dishes without onion and garlic, which was really difficult for an onion-garlic addict like me.

Apart from some fried crispies we had Tamarind Poha and Sweet Corn Appe (recipe below) as the main snacks along with some Mint-lemon Tea for the tea party. I do not have the photos of the actual party since I was very busy making and serving hot Corn Appe , so these are all ‘after’ photos with whatever leftovers I had.

As I mentioned in my earlier post, I had some 2 kgs of corn to be used up, I made a no onion- sweet corn version of Appe. Appe are small round savoury steamed cakes usually made with the Idli batter and spices to enhance the flavor. An Appe mould or tava as it is called (Aebleskiver pan) is a must for making these delightful little balls of goodness.

The Sweet corn added a lovely crunch to the spicy appe and I did not miss the onions at all. Infact, everyone asked me for the recipe. A simple sweet corn twist in the recipe changed the taste of the humble appe!

I served mint-lemon tea along with the snacks. This was a welcome change from the traditional double boiled, tannin loaded dark brown tea that is normally served with Faraal.

My small high tea party is going to be a part of the Big Tea Party at A Mad Tea Party hosted by the wonderful Anita. I love her yearly parties and thanks Anita once again for a lovely theme!

 

Here’s the recipe for the Sweet Corn Appe:

For about 10 Appe

Ingredients:

1 cup Idli batter (I used readymade)

½ cup Sweet corn kernels

3-4 tbsp chopped fresh coriander leaves

2-3 tsp green chilli paste (adjust to your taste)

Salt to taste

1 tsp mustard seeds

2 tsp oil for the tadka(tempering)

more Oil for shallow frying the Appe.

Method

Mix together the idli batter, sweetcorn, coriander leaves, chilli paste and salt.

In a small pan heat 2 tsp oil and add the mustard seeds and heat till they crackle.

Add the mustard seeds+oil to the above batter.

Mixwell.

Heat the Appe pan/tava.

Drop spoonfuls of the batter into each round mould in the pan.

Drizzle little oil from the sides of the batter.

Cover and cook for 5-6 minutes on low heat or till the lower part of the Appe turns golden.

Turn each Appe with a wooden skewer (if using non stick pan) and cook on the other side for another 5 minutes.

Insert the skewer and test the Appe for doneness. (The batter should not stick to the skewer).

Serve hot with chutney or sauce.

Note:

I used readymade Idli batter since I had to make ~ 50 Appe’s.

My mom makes a version of Appe with a mixture of daals and rice for the batter. So you can also add a mixture of Daals instead of just Urad daal to the batter.

Corn- ذرة on Foodista

September 15, 2010 at 10:42 am 11 comments

Pickled Beets

I love Beets, so whenever I see fresh juicy Beets in the farmers market I cannot resist the temptation to buy them. The Beets that are usually available locally are quite big in size. I just love to boil them, chop and sprinkle some salt and pepper and eat it right away, when they are still warm. My other favourite Beet recipe is beet+Yoghurt- Raita/Koshimbir.

I saw these cute little baby Beets the other day in the market and couldn’t resist buying them. Even as I was buying them, this recipe for Pickled Beets from Elise @Simply Recipes was on my mind. The Beets were scrubbed clean the moment I reached home- Boiled (I did that in a pressure cooker), cooled, cut and dressed with the mustard vinaigrette -all done in no time. I have changed the proportion of ingredients to suit our taste.

These delicious Pickled beets are now a favourite in our house and we add them to everything from salads to wraps!

Thanks Elise for this simple yet delicious Pickled Beets recipe, my family loves it!

Here’s the recipe:

Ingredients:

6-7 Baby Beets

 For the vinaigrette:

2 tsp split mustard seeds (or you can use dry mustard)

~2 tbsp Cider Vinegar

~1/2 tbsp sugar

1 tsp black pepper crushed

1 tbsp olive oil

Salt to taste

 Method:

Clean and boil the Baby Beets (I used a pressure cooker). Peel off the skin and halve them (If you do not have baby Beets, use the big ones and chop them into cubes after boiling)

Whisk together the ingredients for the Vinaigrette in a mixing bowl. Adjust the sugar or pepper/salt if required.

Add the boiled beets.

Mix nicely for all the beets to coat.

Keep covered at room temperature for ~ 1 hour.

Serve as a side dish or add to salads or wraps.

These Pickled beets recipes are being sent just in time for Blog Bites #6 @One Hot Stove

August 25, 2010 at 2:31 pm 7 comments

Raw Banana cutlets and Mix Friut Chutney for The 4 Velveteers!

I received a bag full of home-grown green/raw bananas from my mother’s backyard last week. I have never actually cooked anything with raw banana. My recipe search led me to this wonderful Raw banana and peas cutlet recipe from Sanjeev Kapoor.

These sinful cutlets made with cooked Raw banana, Green peas and a handful of spices make a very good party starter or a tea tine snack. It does not require any binding and are very easy to shape and fry. I tried a shallow fried version but the original deep fried version tastes better. The cutlets were crisp and crunchy and the raw banana-peas was a super hit ‘made-for each other’ combo. It is a keeper recipe and I am going to make it whenever I can lay my hands on raw bananas, even if it means some sinful-deep fried indulgence!

I made a few changes to the original recipe in the proportions of the ingredients to suit our taste.

I serve the Raw banana and peas cutlet along with a Mix fruit chutney (recipe follows) here for the 4- Velveteers challenge for August.

The 4 Velveteers  (started by Pamela, Aparna, Asha, and Alessio) is ‘A food bloggers monthly event spanning the 7 seas. Different cultures,different palates, different backgrounds are the best spices to excite our palates

I joined the group this month and the lovely Asha of Forkspoonknife challenged us to create a savory dish where fruit(s) play the lead role!

Here’s the recipe for the Raw banana and peas cutlet:

Ingredients:

7-8 green/raw bananas peeled, cubed and pressure cooked till soft

~3/4th cup green peas boiled and mashed

4-5 green chillies finely chopped

½ tsp Red chilli powder

½ tsp Amchur (Raw Mango) powder

1 tsp Garam Masala powder

1/2 tsp grated fresh ginger

Few sprigs coriander leaves, cleaned washed and finely chopped

A pinch of Asafoetida

Salt to taste

Oil for deep frying

 Method:

Mash the cooked green bananas.

Take the mashed banana and mashed peas in a mixing bowl.

Add all other ingredients except the oil.

Mix well.

Shape the mixture into round or heart shape cutlets.

Heat oil in a wok.

Deep fry the cutlets till golden brown.

Drain on an absorbent paper.

Serve hot with mix fruit chutney or any sauce of your choice.

 Mix fruit Chutney:

This mix fruit chutney was made in an attempt to save the fruits lurking in the fridge which were threatening to rot.

I have used up whatever fruits were available balancing the sweet and sour taste. I knew this would not have passed up as a jam, So to make it more flavourful I added some red chilli powder ,other spices and some refreshing mint leaves. The result was a fabulous Sweet-sour and spicy chutney which can be used as a dip for almost anything. I also had it as a substitute to tamarind chutney in pani puri!

Recipe for Mix fruit chutney:

Ingredients:

2 Golden delicious apples peeled and chopped

4-5 red plums chopped

3-4 canned pineapple rings chopped

5-6 dried figs chopped

5-6 dried apricots chopped

~ 2 candied Indian Gooseberries (Amla)

4-5 dried pitted prunes chopped

1/4th cup raisins

3/4 cup dates (Khajur) chopped

2-3 tsp Red chilli powder

2 tsp Garam Masala

1 tsp Black pepper powder

1 tsp Chaat masala

2tbsp apple cider vinegar

½ cup mint leaves chopped

Salt to taste

 Method:

Mix all the fruits fresh as well as dried in a deep pan along with ~1/2 cup of water.

Cook on low heat for 15-20 minutes, stirring in between and adjusting the water as required.

Add the spices, salt and vinegar and cook for another 15- 20 minutes or till all the fruits are mushy and cooked.

Set aside to cool.

Run in a blender along with the mint leaves to a smooth chutney consistency.

Serve with cutlets or chips, puris, crackers or crudities or use as a breadspread!

This chutney refrigerates well for about 1 week.

 

Please also checkout what the other Velveteers have created:

Aparna : Eggless Vegetable- Nut Loaf with a sweet and spicy Mango Jalapeno sauce

Pamela: Green Papaya Curry

Ken : Skillet Roasted Sweet n Sour Pork

August 22, 2010 at 8:17 pm 19 comments

Monsoon Magic-Minty Dal Vada

Dark clouds, light showers, gentle breeze; spent the most magical weekend lounging in front of the TV with hot spicy food and Ginger Chai.

Our garden now wears a fresh green coat. Flowers bloom and my herb garden is alive again! The Monsoon has brought fresh new life to the surroundings.

This Minty Dal Vada is a rainy day ‘comfort food for the soul’!Mint, Coriander, green chillies, and ginger together lend a delectable flavor to these crunchy Chana Dal (Bengal gram) fritters. The hot spicy Vadas are a perfect tea time snack accompanied by a cup of fresh ginger tea or are great party starters.

Here’s the recipe:(recipe source- my Mother-in-Law)

Minty Dal Vada recipe

3 cups Chana dal soaked in water for 2-3 hrs

1 cup grated fresh coconut

1 bunch mint leaves cleaned, washed and chopped

Few coriander sprigs,

1” piece ginger chopped,

8-10 green chillies chopped (or as spicy as you like)

2 small onions finely chopped

Salt to taste

Oil for deep frying

 Drain the water from the Dal. Spread on a kitchen towel to soak up the moisture.

Coarsely grind the Chana dal with the salt, coconut, mint, coriander, green chillies and ginger. (Do not grind to a fine paste)

Just before frying add the chopped onions and mix well.

Shape lemon sized balls of this mixture to small patties like fritters.

Deep fry on medium heat till golden brown.

Serve hot immediately.No accompaniments necessary!

 Note: As a variation you can substitute the Mint with other herbs like dill.

July 5, 2010 at 5:38 pm 4 comments

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